Tag:Gordon Beckham
Posted on: December 7, 2011 3:20 am
 

White Sox trade Santos, and it's only the start

DALLAS -- The rebuilding process has officially begun on the South Side of Chicago, and by the time it ends the White Sox could look nothing like the disappointing team that finished 79-83 last year.

General manager Ken Williams took the first step Tuesday, trading closer Sergio Santos to the Blue Jays for pitching prospect Nestor Molina. Bigger steps should follow, with the White Sox signaling to other teams that pitchers John Danks and Gavin Floyd, outfielder Carlos Quentin and second baseman Gordon Beckham are among those available.

In fact, sources familiar with the Sox plans said, it is entirely possible that Danks, Floyd, Quentin and Beckham and others could all be elsewhere by opening day.

"It is the start of a rebuilding," Williams told Chicago writers. "And you guys know I have not used that word in 12 years."

Williams has been threatening to break up this team since the middle of last season, and only a few wins in the final week of July kept the Sox from shopping many players at the July 31 deadline.

Williams then said at last month's general managers meetings that he had trades in mind, and promised to use the word "rebuilding" by January if he could get what he wanted.

It turned out he used it in the first week of December.

The Santos move helps the Blue Jays, who have spent the first part of the winter looking for a closer. The White Sox got back a 22-year-old right-hander with sparkling minor-league numbers (27-7, 2.21, 277 strikeouts in 292 2/3 innings), but a pitcher who the Blue Jays and some other teams project as a middle reliever in the big leagues because of his slight build.


Posted on: December 7, 2011 3:20 am
 

White Sox trade Santos, and it's only the start

DALLAS -- The rebuilding process has officially begun on the South Side of Chicago, and by the time it ends the White Sox could look nothing like the disappointing team that finished 79-83 last year.

General manager Ken Williams took the first step Tuesday, trading closer Sergio Santos to the Blue Jays for pitching prospect Nestor Molina. Bigger steps should follow, with the White Sox signaling to other teams that pitchers John Danks and Gavin Floyd, outfielder Carlos Quentin and second baseman Gordon Beckham are among those available.

In fact, sources familiar with the Sox plans said, it is entirely possible that Danks, Floyd, Quentin and Beckham and others could all be elsewhere by opening day.

"It is the start of a rebuilding," Williams told Chicago writers. "And you guys know I have not used that word in 12 years."

Williams has been threatening to break up this team since the middle of last season, and only a few wins in the final week of July kept the Sox from shopping many players at the July 31 deadline.

Williams then said at last month's general managers meetings that he had trades in mind, and promised to use the word "rebuilding" by January if he could get what he wanted.

It turned out he used it in the first week of December.

The Santos move helps the Blue Jays, who have spent the first part of the winter looking for a closer. The White Sox got back a 22-year-old right-hander with sparkling minor-league numbers (27-7, 2.21, 277 strikeouts in 292 2/3 innings), but a pitcher who the Blue Jays and some other teams project as a middle reliever in the big leagues because of his slight build.


Posted on: November 15, 2011 9:10 pm
 

The White Sox could be . . . rebuilding?

MILWAUKEE -- The last time I mentioned rebuilding to Kenny Williams, he scoffed at the idea.

"You know me," the White Sox general manager said. "You know Ozzie. As competitive as we are, do you think we could accept rebuilding?"

That was a few years back.

Ozzie Guillen is gone. The White Sox went through a thoroughly frustrating and disappointing 2011 season.

Times have changed.

And now the White Sox are . . . rebuilding?

It sure sounds that way.

They're readier than ever to say good-bye to free agent starter Mark Buehrle, a mainstay in the Sox rotation since 2001. They're more willing than ever to trade starters John Danks and Gavin Floyd ("If you're going to trade one, you might as well trade both," one rival general manager said). They'd definitely deal Carlos Quentin. They could well be willing to deal Gordon Beckham.

If they do everything they want, Williams said Tuesday, they will definitely be rebuilding. If they do everything they want, Williams promises to even admit that they are rebuilding.

"I'd use [the word]," he said. "If we do this, I'd use it. Check with me in January."

The White Sox won't have a total makeover. It's not possible. No one is taking the Alex Rios contract, or the Adam Dunn contract.

And as for the players he can trade, Williams said he isn't just looking to fill specific needs.

"There are specific players it would take to get [Danks and/or Floyd]," he said. "Reasonable baseball deals. But impactful players. High-ceiling players."

High-ceiling young players, or exactly the kind of players you'd expect a rebuilding team to acquire.

Williams says this doesn't mean he'd be giving up on 2012. Fair enough, because talented young teams can win.

But with the White Sox very possibly rebuilding, and the Twins in a total state of flux, and the Indians and Royals still young, the Tigers may well be the biggest favorite of any team in any division next April.

"They'd be a heavy favorite," one National League general manager said Tuesday.

And the White Sox -- the Kenny Williams White Sox -- would be . . . rebuilding.
Posted on: September 25, 2009 2:43 pm
 

Updating the award races ... and the Braves

In the (e-)mail this morning, there was a nice note from the Mariners explaining why Felix Hernandez should win the Cy Young Award. Last night on the MLB network's Tigers-Indians telecast, Victor Rojas and Mitch Williams were touting Justin Verlander as a serious Cy contender.

And this morning in the New York Daily News, Mike Lupica was insisting that Joe Girardi is the AL Manager of the Year.

So did I jump the gun in writing Sunday that the major awards seem to be decided, and that the Rookie of the Year races are the ones with suspense?

I still don't think so. I still think Zack Greinke wins the Cy Young (his win over the Red Sox Tuesday sure didn't hurt his chances), and I still think Joe Mauer and Albert Pujols win the MVP awards easily. I'm sticking with Chris Carpenter for the NL Cy, although I'll admit that one will be close. And I think it will be Mike Scioscia and Jim Tracy for Manager of the Year.

Apparently, most readers don't have a problem with that, since the e-mails I got were about Rookie of the Year candidates I left out. Even though I mentioned six candidates in the AL and six in the NL, readers found fault with me for not mentioning more.

From Ethan: "How is there no mention of Gordon Beckham?"

From Greg: "Even though he has no chance of winning, Nolan Reimold should have at least been mentioned."

You know what, Ethan, you're right, Beckham deserved a mention. And so did Reimold. And maybe Casey McGehee of the Brewers, who inspired two commenters.

And all that does is prove my original point: When it comes to the 2009 awards, the Rookie races are where it's at.

*****

In my Bobby Cox column Wednesday, I wrote that Cox's Braves "won't win this year."

I still believe that, but now that they've closed to within 3 1/2 games of the wild-card leading Rockies, I'll admit I was a little hasty in writing them off. Especially since the Braves will play seven of their remaining 10 games against the Nationals.

The Braves are just 7-4 against Washington this year, but it's not crazy to think they could sweep those seven games, and maybe go 2-1 in their other remaining series, at home against the Marlins. That would leave the Braves with a 91-71 final record.

The Rockies finish with home series against the Cardinals and Brewers, and then three games in Los Angeles with the Dodgers. It's no stretch to think that they could go 5-4 in those games, which would also leave them at 91-71.

Coolstandings.com gives the Braves a 12.4 percent chance of overtaking the Rockies, and that's probably about right. It's not a great chance, but it's too much to say that the Braves "won't win this year."

*****

As Ed Price of AOL Fanhouse and Bob Nightengale of USA Today have pointed out, in one weird scenario, the Yankees and Red Sox could both have clinching celebrations Sunday at Yankee Stadium.

Here's how: The Yankees have a magic number of five to clinch the AL East. If they sweep the Red Sox, they clinch the division with Sunday's win.

The Red Sox have a magic number of three to clinch the wild card. Even if they get swept by the Yankees, they would clinch Sunday if the Rangers also get swept at home by the Rays. With the Rangers-Rays game beginning at 3:05 EDT, the Red Sox would probably have to wait around in their clubhouse for it to end, but they would still clinch on the same day, and in the same ballpark.
 
 
 
 
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