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Report: Shin-Soo Choo turned down seven-year offer from Yankees

By Mike Axisa | Baseball Writer

Shin-Soo Choo turned down a big offer from the free-spending Yankees.
Shin-Soo Choo turned down a big offer from the free-spending Yankees. (USATSI)

MORE: FA tracker: position players | FA tracker: pitchers

According to Jeff Passan of Yahoo! Sports, free agent outfielder Shin-Soo Choo rejected a seven-year, $140 million contract offer from the Yankees not too long ago. The offer was made after the team signed Jacoby Ellsbury and once it was was declined, they moved on and signed Carlos Beltran.

Choo, 31, has multiple standing offers according to Passan. The Astros, Rangers, Mariners and Diamondbacks have been most connected to him recently, but Arizona's interest subsided following the Mark Trumbo trade. Choo is a Scott Boras client and by far the best free agent position player left on the market.

In 154 games with the Reds in 2013, Choo hit .285/.423/.462 (143 OPS+) with 21 home runs and 20 stolen bases. He has hit .290/.392/.469 (137 OPS+) while averaging 21 homers and 21 steals per 162 games since breaking into the league in 2008.

The Yankees reportedly knew Robinson Cano was leaving for the Mariners a few days before their big signings took place. They moved quickly to sign Ellsbury and then added Beltran a few days later. Given the timing of the moves, the offer to Choo appears to have been made sometime between Dec. 3-6.

Passan says Boras countered New York's offer with something similar to the seven-year, $153 million pact they gave Ellsbury. It'll be interesting to see how Choo's eventual contract compares to the Yankees' offer.

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