NFL Draft: Myles Garrett, Jonathan Allen, Malik Hooker headline top 100 prospects

Each year, I update my top-50 draft board after the NFL Scouting Combine. My initial top-50 draft board from before the all-star circuit can be found here.

However, as I mapped out my updated top-50 prospects, I hated leaving out too many players and decided to expand the list to my top-100. This draft class might not have ten true top-10 picks, but there are 100-plus prospects worthy of a spot in the top two rounds.

1. Myles Garrett , DE, Texas A&M (6-4, 272, 4.64)

Once the final selection was made in the 2016 NFL Draft, Garrett became the No. 1 prospect available for the 2017 class and that has held true since last spring. With his explosive get-off and ability to rush the passer in different ways, this former Aggie is the easy favorite to be drafted first overall.

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Garrett has been the top-rated prospect in the land since last year’s NFL Draft concluded.  Getty Images

2. Jonathan Allen , DL, Alabama Crimson Tide (6-3, 286, 5.00)

A true scheme-versatile lineman, Allen has the skill-set and ball awareness to be productive inside or outside in various fronts. He converts speed to power with contact balance and body control, also showing the lateral agility to knife through gaps and out-leverage blockers.


3. Malik Hooker , FS, Ohio State Buckeyes (6-1, 206, 4.47)

With only one season of starting experience, Hooker still has plenty of areas that require refinement, mainly his consistency as a downhill run defender. But his ball production this past season was remarkable due to the natural instincts, athletic range and ballskills, displaying difference-maker potential. The medicals are crucial for Hooker to maintain this ranking.


4. Jamal Adams , SS, LSU Tigers (6-0, 214, 4.56)

The heartbeat of LSU’s defense, Adams is an alpha with the skills and mentality to contribute from day one in the NFL. He’ll arrive too hot at times, but his play speed is a strength to his game along with his physical nature to be comfortable playing anywhere on the field.


5. Solomon Thomas , DL, Stanford Cardinal (6-3, 273, 4.69)

Although he might not fit the prototype in terms of body type, Thomas is a balanced athlete who beats blockers with initial quickness and powerful hand tactics. He has a pre-snap plan, but can also alter mid-rush and projects best as a defensive end who can rush from inside on passing downs.


6. Marshon Lattimore , CB, Ohio State (6-0, 193, 4.36)

After missing time over his first two seasons in Columbus due to injuries, Lattimore stayed healthy in 2016 and produced impressive game film for NFL teams to evaluate. A twitchy athlete, the redshirt sophomore has the lower body explosiveness and speed to attach himself to receivers in man coverage.


7. Dalvin Cook , RB, Florida State Seminoles (5-10, 210, 4.49)

The two main traits NFL teams want in a running back prospect: can you navigate and create? Cook is exceptional in both areas with the foot quickness and vision to gash defenses. His history of shoulder issues could knock him down draft boards, but he has the best talent at running back in this class.


8. Reuben Foster , LB, Alabama (6-1, 229, 4.72)

Few linebacker prospects in recent memory showed the violence and explosive burst like Foster did at Alabama. Although he needs to improve hiccups in coverage, the Tide’s leading tackler is a power athlete with the range, instincts and predator mentality ideal for the next level.


9. Ryan Ramczyk , OT, Wisconsin Badgers (6-6, 310, 5.29)

In a weak class of offensive tackles, Ramczyk is one of the few with a chance to crash the top-20 picks. The former Division-III transfer has had a tremendous trajectory from high school until now and projects as a starter early in his NFL career -- if the medicals with his hip check out.


10. Mitch Trubisky , QB, North Carolina Tar Heels (6-2, 222, 4.67)

One season of starting experience is far from ideal, but that doesn’t make Trubisky’s 2016 film any less impressive, showing NFL starter traits. His decision-making needs fine-tuned, but his combination of physical skills and accuracy downfield are why NFL teams view him as a possible top-10 pick.

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Trubisky’s combination of physical skills and accuracy are why scouts view him as a possible top-10 pick. USATSI

11. Haason Reddick , LB, Temple Owls (6-1, 237, 4.52)

Used all over the front-seven at Temple, Reddick lined up mostly as a defensive end, but projects best as an off-ball linebacker in the NFL. He is comfortable in space with above average athleticism and the secondary quickness to work off blocks and track down ballcarriers.


12. Mike Williams , WR, Clemson Tigers (6-4, 218, 4.58)

There will be faster wideouts in the 2017 class, but none have the combination of size, ballskills and body control that Williams shows on film. His large catch radius and quick reflexes make him dominant in contested situations, especially on back shoulder and fade routes.


13. Corey Davis , WR, Western Michigan Broncos (6-3, 209, 4.48)

One of the most productive pass-catchers in NCAA history, Davis is physically built for the NFL with the route athleticism and polish that dominated MAC competition. He might not have any true dominant qualities, but he is very savvy and competes with a survivor mentality.


14. Derek Barnett , DE, Tennessee Volunteers (6-3, 259, 4.88)

One of the most productive pass rushers in SEC history, Barnett isn’t naturally explosive off the edge, but he can bend and win with flexibility, instincts and power. He is consistently in the right place at the right time to be a reliable edge player vs. both the run and the pass.


15. O.J. Howard , TE, Alabama (6-6, 251, 4.51)

A very athletic and toolsy prospect, Howard wasn’t the high-volume receiver you expect from a prospect graded in the top-20, but it won’t surprise anyone if he ends up being a better pro than collegiate tight end. He isn’t an overpowering blocker, but he does just enough to be a reliable three-down NFL player.


16. Leonard Fournette , RB, LSU (6-0, 240, 4.51)

Simply put, Fournette is a freak of nature. His blend of size, speed and strength is rare and the best NFL comparison in terms of body type and natural ability might be Carolina Panthers linebacker Thomas Davis . He has some areas that require fine-tuning, but Fournette is a different breed of athlete.


17. David Njoku , TE, Miami (Fla.) Hurricanes (6-4, 246, 4.64)

With only 64 career catches, Njoku doesn’t have a large sample size, but his natural athleticism and pass-catching skills are impressive. He is underdeveloped as a blocker and needs route maintenance, but his fluid acceleration makes him a mismatch down the field and scouts are understandably excited about his upside.


18. Christian McCaffrey , RB, Stanford (5-11, 202, 4.48)

A do-everything back, McCaffrey lacks an ideal build to be a true feature NFL running back, but with his versatility to line up in the slot and be a chess piece on offense, he is deserving of top-20 consideration. McCaffrey is very quick to read and react and is one of the most intelligent runners I’ve studied.


19. Forrest Lamp , OT/OG, Western Kentucky Hilltoppers (6-4, 309, 5.00)

A four-year starter at left tackle, Lamp might be able to stay at tackle in the NFL, but he projects much better inside at guard due to his square-blocking style and lack of length. He has the body control, core strength and stubborn mentality to start and thrive early in his pro career.


20. Malik McDowell , DL, Michigan State Spartans (6-6, 295, 4.85)

Based on his flashes, McDowell is one of the top-five talents in this draft class, but inconsistency and concerns over fit create some doubt. Nonetheless, he has outstanding movement skills for a man his size with the length and upper body strength to rush from different positions up front.

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McDowell is one of the top-five talents in this draft class. USATSI

21. John Ross , WR, Washington Huskies (5-11, 188, 4.22)

After switching between offense and defense earlier in his career, Ross has developed into a very polished route runner with the vertical speed and sudden footwork to manipulate coverages. If the training staff signs off, Ross will be off the board quickly.


22. Takkarist McKinley , DE/OLB, UCLA Bruins (6-2, 250, 4.59)

One of the most athletic edge rushers in this class, McKinley doesn’t have ideal size and isn’t yet the sum of his parts, but he has the initial burst to get blockers off rhythm. His recent shoulder surgery might put his availability for training camp in jeopardy, but his long-term prognosis is favorable.


23. Taco Charlton , DE, Michigan Wolverines (6-6, 277, 4.92)

An edge rusher who passes the eye test, Charlton needs to develop his pass rush repertoire and play with more consistent pad level, but he moves very well for his size and plays reminiscent of Justin Tuck when he was coming out of Notre Dame Fighting Irish .


24. Zach Cunningham , LB, Vanderbilt Commodores (6-3, 234, 4.67)

A linebacker with a quick trigger, Cunningham’s game tape is like a clinic on how to play the position. His play speed makes him tough to block, diagnosing in a flash and arriving with pop to detach from blocks and make stops. The production (125 tackles, 16.5 for loss in 2016) matches the tape.


25. Curtis Samuel , RB, Ohio State (5-11, 196, 4.31)

The east coast version of McCaffrey, Samuel was the only FBS player with 700-plus yards rushing and receiving this past season. He projects very well as a slot receiver with his routes and reliable ballskills, but also averaged 7.9 yards per rush in 2016 and is a true hybrid weapon in the NFL.


26. Evan Engram , WR/TE, Ole Miss (6-3, 234, 4.42)

Listed as a tight end on the roster, Engram was more of a wideout in the Ole Miss offense and projects best as a “big” slot receiver in the NFL. He is quick to release off the line of scrimmage, enter his route and give his quarterback a clean target, securing passes with his strong hands.


27. DeShone Kizer , QB, Notre Dame (6-4, 233, 4.83)

Although his 2016 tape was far from perfect, Kizer was making mistakes you’d expect from a 20-year-old sophomore and it is encouraging to think where he might be in his development a few years from now. He checks the necessary boxes physically and mentally with a high number of NFL throws on his Notre Dame film.


28. Deshaun Watson , QB, Clemson (6-2, 221, 4.66)

A proven winner at the college level, Watson has the mental make-up and intangibles that will endear him to pro coaches. He also has the arm strength and mobility needed for the next level, but his inconsistent ball placement and awareness from the pocket make his NFL evaluation tricky.


29. Charles Harris , DE, Missouri Tigers (6-3, 253, 4.82)

A player still very young in football years, Harris has the short-area burst to win the corner, stay low and finish at the quarterback. He doesn’t own efficient pass rush moves at this point in his development, but the initial quickness off the edge is a great place to start.


30. Marlon Humphrey , CB, Alabama (6-0, 197, 4.41)

Humphrey, who is the son of 1989 first-round running back Bobby Humphrey, has the physical ingredients ideal for the position with his size and athleticism. His hands-on approach will lead to frustrating penalties, but he can press and keep receivers uncomfortable on the outside.

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Humphrey has the skills to press and keep receivers uncomfortable on the outside.  USATSI

31. Fabian Moreau , CB, UCLA (6-0, 206, 4.35)

A high school running back, Moreau steadily developed on defense for the Bruins and belongs in the top-50 conversation. He has some flaws, but doesn’t give up much separation in man coverage with the size/speed blend to blanket receivers.


32. Budda Baker , FS, Washington (5-10, 195, 4.45)

A defensive back with a honey badger mentality, Baker has the playing range, timing and pop at contact that jumps off the screen. Although his overaggressive tendencies lead to mistakes and his lack of ideal size also shows, Baker can do a little bit of everything and fits best as a NFL nickelback.


33. T.J. Watt , DE/OLB, Wisconsin (6-4, 252, 4.69)

While better known as J.J.’s younger brother, Watt has a chance to make a name for himself with his pass rush potential. Ideally suited as a stand-up rusher in a 3-4 scheme, Watt isn’t a flexible rusher who will bend the edge, but his energy, contact balance and hand strength allow him to be productive.


34. Chad Hansen , WR, California Golden Bears (6-2, 202, 4.53)

A transfer from the FCS-level, Hansen waited his turn at Cal and dominated as a junior in 2016, attacking defenses at every level with the athleticism to get open and create after the catch. He is simply a fun player to watch play football.


35. Jabrill Peppers , LB/SS, Michigan (5-11, 213, 4.46)

While athleticism and hustle aren’t concerns, Peppers lacks a true identity on the roster. He struggles in coverage and lacks ideal body type to live near the line of scrimmage, requiring a hybrid role to be a starter in the NFL. Peppers will get better once he can focus on one position and set of responsibilities.


36. Garett Bolles , OT, Utah Utes (6-5, 297, 4.95)

An older prospect, Bolles was out of football after high school before turning around his personal life and rediscovering his love for football. He needs core strength and technique work, but his athleticism is outstanding and will help mask his other deficiencies.


37. Teez Tabor , CB, Florida Gators (6-0, 199, 4.62)

Comfortable in press and off-coverage, Tabor doesn’t have ideal long-speed for the position, but trusts his talent and competes with the “my ball” mentality needed for the NFL. He needs to pay more attention to his technique, but the position appears to come very natural to him.


38. Carl Lawson , DE/OLB, Auburn Tigers (6-2, 261, 4.67)

A Brandon Graham type of rusher, Lawson does a great job using his lower body movement skills and upper body power in unison to beat blockers off the edge. He lacks ideal length and his past medical issues are a concern, but Lawson has the energetic play style off the edge that NFL teams covet.


39. Jourdan Lewis , CB, Michigan (5-10, 188, 4.54)

An interesting test case, Lewis has the film and coverage skills of a first round cornerback, showing speed, toughness and ball awareness. However, his lack of size, length and growth potential also shows on his film in both the run game and coverage.


40. Tre’Davious White, CB, LSU (5-11, 192, 4.47)

White returned to Baton Rouge for his senior season to boost his draft stock and he did just that, cementing his status as a top-50 pick for several evaluators. A strong run defender as well, White has the patient feet in reverse to shadow receivers and make plays on the ball (16 passes defended in 2016).

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White has the reputation for being a strong run defender.  USATSI

41. Jarrad Davis , LB, Florida (6-1, 238, 4.78)

A physical thumper, Davis is a fun player to watch do work with his mix of power, athleticism and smarts. There isn’t a huge gap between him and Rueben Foster as prospects, but Davis has struggled to stay healthy and his lack of durability might scare off some teams.


42. Tarell Basham , DE, Ohio Bobcats (6-4, 269, 4.70)

A player who improved every season in college, Basham earned MAC defensive player of the year honors in 2016, leaving Ohio with the school record with 29.5 career sacks. His blend of quickness, power and length helps him win one-on-one battles on the edges.


43. Duke Riley , LB, LSU (6-0, 232, 4.58)

Taking the Deion Jones path to the pros, Riley starred on special teams as an underclassman, waiting his turn and rising up draft boards since he became a starter last fall. His play speed and attacking motor are what teams are looking for at the position.


44. Gareon Conley , CB, Ohio State (6-0, 195, 4.44)

Ohio State’s “other” corner, Conley tends to play on his heels too much, but he moves well and consistently stays within arm’s length of the receiver. He might not be elite in any one area, but is solid across the board and doesn’t have a major deficiency that should keep him from being a versatile NFL starter.


45. Kevin King , CB, Washington (6-3, 200, 4.43)

Although King’s thin-boned, slight frame stands out, so does his exceptional height and length for the position -- valuable inches that give him an advantage at the catch point. With his improved route anticipation and ballskills, King has the makings of a future NFL starter in a press scheme.


46. Pat Mahomes, QB, Texas Tech (6-2, 225, 4.80)

Groomed in a quarterback-friendly offense, Mahomes is very raw mentally, but his arm talent and natural instincts stand out on film. Although he isn’t ready for NFL snaps, he has a very high ceiling at the next level for a team willing to be patient with him.


47. ArDarius Stewart , WR, Alabama (5-11, 204, 4.49)

A former high school quarterback, Stewart is still relatively new to the position and needs mechanical work in certain areas, but he is a three-level threat. He has yet to play his best football and can be as good as his volume once he gets to the NFL.


48. Marcus Williams , FS, Utah (6-1, 202, 4.56)

The only player from a power-five conference with five or more interceptions each of the past two seasons, Williams has the athletic range that allows him to cover a lot of green. He is a prototypical centerfield safety who can be a playmaker from his single-high perch.


49. Pat Elflein , OC, Ohio State (6-3, 303, 5.12)

Elflein isn’t the type of blocker who will simply overwhelm defenders, but his combination of quickness, toughness and intelligence gets the job done. He is a very efficient snap-to-step player and has the skill-set to be a quality starting center in the NFL for a long time.


50. Josh Jones , FS, NC State Wolfpack (6-1, 220, 4.41)

After he moved from strong to free safety in 2016, Jones looked like a new player and watched his production skyrocket. He is a big, rangy athlete with the play strength, versatility and developing football IQ that translates well to the NFL game.

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Jones moved to free safety and his production skyrocketed. USATSI

Prospects 51-100: 

  • 51. Tyus Bowser , DE/OLB, Houston Cougars (6-3, 247, 4.65)
  • 52. Tim Williams , DE/OLB, Alabama (6-3, 244, 4.68)
  • 53. Cam Robinson , OT, Alabama (6-6, 322, 5.15)
  • 54. Dan Feeney , OG, Indiana Hoosiers (6-4, 305, 5.24)
  • 55. Adam Shaheen, TE, Ashland (6-6, 278, 4.79)
  • 56. Dion Dawkins , OG, Temple (6-4, 314, 5.11)
  • 57. Larry Ogunjobi , DT, Charlotte 49ers (6-3, 305, 4.97)
  • 58. Caleb Brantley , DT, Florida (6-3, 307, 5.14)
  • 59. Cordrea Tankersley , CB, Clemson (6-1, 199, 4.40)
  • 60. Alvin Kamara , RB, Tennessee (5-10, 214, 4.56)
  • 61. Chris Godwin , WR, Penn State Nittany Lions (6-1, 209, 4.42)
  • 62. Carlos Henderson , WR, Louisiana Tech Bulldogs (5-11, 199, 4.46)
  • 63. Desmond King , DB, Iowa Hawkeyes (5-10, 201, 4.53)
  • 64. Derek Rivers, DE/OLB, Youngstown State (6-4, 248, 4.61)
  • 65. Joe Mixon , RB, Oklahoma Sooners (6-1, 228, 4.47)
  • 66. Taylor Moton , OT, Western Michigan (6-5, 319, 5.18)
  • 67. Jordan Willis , DE, Kansas State Wildcats (6-4, 255, 4.53)
  • 68. Ryan Anderson , LB, Alabama (6-2, 253, 4.78)
  • 69. Adoree Jackson, CB, Southern California Trojans (5-10, 186, 4.42)
  • 70. Raekwon McMillan , LB, Ohio State (6-2, 240, 4.61)
  • 71. Zay Jones , WR, East Carolina Pirates (6-2, 201, 4.45)
  • 72. Dede Westbrook , WR, Oklahoma (6-0, 178, 4.39)
  • 73. Chris Wormley , DL, Michigan (6-5, 298, 4.92)
  • 74. Quincy Wilson , DB, Florida (6-1, 211, 4.54)
  • 75. Dalvin Tomlinson , DT, Alabama (6-3, 310, 5.19)
  • 76. Cooper Kupp , WR, Eastern Washington (6-2, 204, 4.62)
  • 77. Ahkello Witherspoon , CB, Colorado Buffaloes (6-3, 198, 4.45)
  • 78. Antonio Garcia , OT, Troy Trojans (6-6, 302, 5.15)
  • 79. Jake Butt , TE, Michigan (6-5, 246, 4.74)
  • 80. Dorian Johnson , OG, Pittsburgh Panthers (6-5, 300, 5.27)
  • 81. Chidobe Awuzie , CB, Colorado (6-0, 202, 4.43)
  • 82. Amara Darboh , WR, Michigan (6-2, 214, 4.45)
  • 83. Eddie Jackson , FS, Alabama (6-0, 201, 4.53)
  • 84. Sidney Jones , CB, Washington (6-0, 186, 4.47)
  • 85. Gerald Everett , TE, South Alabama Jaguars (6-3, 239, 4.62)
  • 86. Jaleel Johnson , DT, Iowa (6-3, 316, 5.38)
  • 87. Marcus Maye , SS, Florida (6-0, 210, 4.64)
  • 88. Obi Melifonwu , SS, Connecticut Huskies (6-4, 224, 4.40)
  • 89. Taywan Taylor , WR, Western Kentucky (5-11, 203, 4.50)
  • 90. Ethan Pocic , OG, LSU (6-6, 310, 5.15)
  • 91. Corn Elder , CB, Miami (Fla.) (5-10, 183, 4.55)
  • 92. Samaje Perine , RB, Oklahoma (5-11, 233, 4.65)
  • 93. Isaiah Ford , WR, Virginia Tech Hokies (6-1, 194, 4.61)
  • 94. Nico Siragusa , OG, San Diego State Aztecs (6-4, 319, 5.35)
  • 95. Shelton Gibson , WR, West Virginia Mountaineers (5-11, 191, 4.50)
  • 96. Nazair Jones , DT, North Carolina (6-5, 304, 5.11)
  • 97. Rasul Douglas, CB, West Virginia (6-2, 209, 4.59)
  • 98. DeMarcus Walker , DL, Florida State (6-4, 280, 4.86)
  • 99. Kareem Hunt , RB, Toledo Rockets (5-10, 216, 4.62)
  • 100. JuJu Smith-Schuster , WR, USC (6-1, 215, 4.54)
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