2015 NFL DRAFT
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Marcus Vick

Height: 6-0 | Weight: 200 | College: Virginia Tech
 
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Overview

The saga of Marcus Vick continues. Regarded as one of the finest athletes in college football, numerous off-field incidents, suspensions and game ejections finally took its toll on the Tech program and Vick was dismissed from school. On Jan. 6, 2006, University President Charles Steger issued a statement that said Vick was permanently dismissed from the Hokie football program due to a cumulative effect of legal infractions and unsportsmanlike play.

Virginia Tech had suspended Vick in 2004, but the university provided one last opportunity for Vick to become a citizen of the university and re-admitted him in January 2005, with the proviso that any future problems would result in automatic dismissal from the team. Head Coach Frank Beamer met with Vick and his mother Jan. 6 and informed the quarterback and his family of the University's decision.

"His recent actions are unfortunate and we wish him well in his future endeavors," said Beamer, "I'm very disappointed that this didn't have a better ending. We wanted what's best for this football team and Vick. I certainly wish him the best."

Known as "Michael's little brother," Vick followed his heralded brother to Warwick High School. He earned All-American honors from Super Prep, Prep Star and Tom Lemming's Prep Football Report. Vick was rated the sixth-best quarterback in the nation by Super Prep and tenth-best by Prep Star. Vick was named to Prep Star's Dream Team and rated the top quarterback in the Atlantic Region by that publication.

Vick compiled over 5,000 yards of total offense during his final two seasons at Warwick. He passed for 1,746 yards and 15 touchdowns as a senior, adding 702 yards and 13 scores on the ground to earn second-team Group AAA All-state honors from the Associated Press. He also threw for 2,180 yards and 19 touchdowns as a junior.

Vick redshirted in 2002 at Virginia Tech, spending the season on the scout team in order to improve his passing fundamentals. He played in eleven games, sitting out the James Madison contest (suspension) in 2003. Vick completed 30 of 57 passes (52.6 percent) for 475 yards, two touchdowns and five interceptions. He rushed 37 times for 102 yards (2.8 avg) and caught four passes for 82 yards, including a score.

Vick was suspended from the team in 2004 after being arrested when a Virginia State police officer pulled him over for speeding and found marijuana in his vehicle. Only a few months earlier, Vick was charged with contributing to the delinquency of minors at a late-night party in Blacksburg.

Re-instated to the team prior to the 2005 season, Vick went on to earn All-Atlantic Coast Conference honors. He connected on 177 of 289 passes (61.2 percent) for 2,393 yards, 17 touchdowns and ten interceptions. He ranked fourth on the team with 380 yards and six scores on 147 carries (2.6 avg). He participated in 436 plays, totaling 2,773 yards in offense.

In 24 games with the Hokies, Vick started thirteen times. He gained 2,868 yards on 207 of 346 pass attempts (59.8 percent) with 19 touchdowns and 15 interceptions. He rushed 184 times for 482 yards (2.6 avg) and six scores, adding four receptions for 82 yards (20.5 avg), including a touchdown. He was on the field for 530 plays, amassing 3,350 yards in total offense.

Analysis

Positives: Has an athletic build with good upper body muscle development, tight abdomen, good thigh and calf definition, above average balance, body control and quickness … Shows valid foot speed to set up in his pass drops … Shows decent touch throwing in the short area … Puts good zip on his tosses when he takes time to set his feet properly … Better throwing on the move and has the lateral movement and second gear to gain positive yardage when tucking the ball and running with it … Excellent open field runner whose burst allows him to win most foot races.

Negatives: Undersized quarterback whose lack of height, inability to get the ball through the throwing arc and failure to recognize underneath coverage has resulted in a high amount of his passes being deflected or intercepted at the line of scrimmage … Looks to run at the first sign of pocket protection breakdown … Has a bit of a windup delivery and while he gets to his throwing point quickly, he will lock on to his primary target and look hesitant when that receiver is covered … Needs to do a much better job making route progression reads … Will force the ball into traffic often and needs to show better patience handling the center snap exchange … Must improve his ability to drop the ball in and vary the speed on his throws (inconsistent feet and mechanics).

Vick is an undersized quarterback whose running ability could see him shift to halfback at the pro level. He has good upper body muscle definition, firm midsection, low body fat and developed thighs and calves. He also shows good athleticism, balance, body control and change of direction agility.

Vick is best when throwing on the move. Because of his lack of height and marginal passing mechanics, quite a few of his pass attempts are batted down at the line of scrimmage (43 in 2005) when throwing from the pocket. He shows quick, smooth feet and speed getting back to his throwing point, planting well before unleashing the ball. Most of his fumbles are the result from carrying the ball too low. He needs to show more patience with the center snap exchange and while he can set up quickly, he is hesitant at times to unleash the ball.

Vick shows a decent over-the-top release, but does not demonstrate the arm strength to throw tight ropes more than 30 yards down field. He shows average judgment throwing over the middle and tends to lock on to his primary targets, failing to make proper progression reads. He will force the ball into traffic when pressured and seems to have more of a run-first mentality. He needs to get his balls through the throwing arc better and is too inconsistent reading defenses. He just does not seem to see underneath coverage (high amount of deflected passes).

When Vick sets his feet, he can get good zip on his throws, but his long ball accuracy is erratic. He gets on hot streaks, but is better on the move and on touch throws. He needs to vary the speed better working in the short area and must put more air under his tosses when going long. Too often, his receivers have to adjust, wait or come back for the ball when Vick tries to toss the "home run" ball.

He shows very good movement in the pocket and has the speed and loose hips to avoid. His problems arise when he fails to recognize protection breakdowns and this led to him getting sacked 33 times in 2005. With more maturity, it is hoped that he will settle down and not throw the ball up when the pocket collapses.

Vick needs to get the ball out quicker. He is not always in sync with his receivers coming out of their breaks and relies a lot on his scrambling ability rather than stepping up and out to buy time in the pocket. For all of his quickness, you would expect him to be very good at buying a second chance to make a big play out of a complete disaster, but he seems to lack a feel for defensive coverages and schemes.

Because of his foot speed, he could be more effective as a running back, as he can gain valid big yardage when breaking into the open and few defenders can recover when he generates that explosive second gear. He can be very elusive on the move because of his change of direction agility and balance.

Still, with his "rap sheet" off the field and countless chances given to mature that he failed to capitalize on, you have to wonder if he is NFL material or possibly an extra in the next sequel to "The Longest Yard." His lack of maturity and responsibility is alarming and Vick's off-field antics will greatly affect his draft stock. While he carries the last name, he is certainly no Michael, both on and off the field.

Career Notes

Only appeared in 24 games at Tech, but his 2,838 yards passing rank tenth on the school's career-record list … His 2,393 passing yards in 2005 rank third on the Hokies' single-season record chart, topped only by Don Strock (2,577 in 1971 and 3,243 in 1972) … His 207 pass completions rank tenth in Tech annals … Gained 3,350 yards in total offense for VT, the 13th-best career total in school history … Amassed 2,773 yards in total offense during the 2005 season, the third-best season total by a Hokie quarterback behind Strock (3,170 in 1972) and Bryan Randall (2,775 in 2004).

2005 Season

All-Atlantic Coast Conference first-team selection in his only year as a starter … Led the ACC and ranked 23rd in the nation with a 143.3 passing efficiency rating … Completed 177 of 289 passes (61.2 percent) for 2,393 yards, seventeen touchdowns and ten interceptions … Ranked fourth on the squad with 147 carries for 380 yards (2.6 avg) and six scores … Was on the field for 436 plays, gaining 2,773 yards in total offense … 43 of his pass attempts were deflected … Sacked 33 times for losses of 218 yards … The opposition recovered four of Vick's nine fumbles.

2005 Game Analysis

North Carolina State … Opened the season by hitting on 120 of 21 tosses for 108 yards, including a 19-yard score to David Clowney … Added 31 yards on 13 runs, but was sacked three times for losses of 20 yards.

Duke … Fumbled once, was sacked twice for minus 10 yards and picked off once, but managed to gain 172 yards on 12 of 19 passes with three touchdowns, including a 35-yarder to Clowney and a 37-yarder to Josh Morgan.

Ohio University … Ran for a 4-yard score and connected on 12 of 16 attempts (75.0 percent) for 200 yards with touchdowns of 28 yards to tight end Jeff King and 3 yards to fullback Jesse Allen, as the offense totaled 475 yards in a 45-0 shutout … Was sacked three times for losses of 22 yards.

Georgia Tech … Completed 13 of 18 throws (72.2 percent) for 223 yards and a 13-yard score to Jeff King, but was also sacked twice for minus 13 yards.

West Virginia … Followed with 177 yards and a pair of touchdowns on 15 of 17 passes (88.2 percent) and carried 12 times for 74 yards, including a 10-yard score … Was also sacked twice for losses of 5 yards.

Marshall … Hit on 11 of 16 tosses for 163 yards, an interception and a 48-yard touchdown to David Clowney … Sacked twice for losses of 15 yards.

Maryland … Guided the team to a 28-9 victory, as the offense gained 497 yards, despite Vick fumbling once on an 8-yard sack and having three passes picked off … Totaled 211 yards on 14 of 23 passes, but exploded for 133 yards with an 8-yard score on 16 carries.

Boston College … The offense generated over 400 yards (492) for the third-straight game, as Vick completed 22 of 28 throws (78.6 percent) for 280 yards and a 3-yard touchdown to Josh Morgan … Was sacked once for minus 8 yards, but rushed 13 times for 52 yards.

Miami … Was completely manhandled in a 27-7 loss … The offense could only total 167 yards, as Vick turned the ball over six times, on four fumbles and two interceptions …

Was also sacked five times for losses of 32 yards … Did score on a late fourth quarter 2-yard run, but hit on only 8 of 22 passes for 90 yards.

Virginia … Had a fumble and an interception, but the offense collected a season-high 509 yards in a 52-14 triumph … Completed 15 of 21 throws (71.4 percent) for 170 yards and scores of

8 yards to Josh Morgan and 24 yards to Eddie Royal … Carried nine times for 32 yards.

North Carolina … Despite the Hokies winning the game, 30-3, Vick continued to struggle … He connected on only 8 of 15 throws for 61 yards and a 1-yard touchdown to

Tight end Jeff King … He was sacked three times for losses of 22 yards, finishing with only a 1-yard gain on seven carries … Also had an interception.

Florida State (ACC Championship) … Accounted for 352 of the team's 376 yards in a 27-22 loss … Threw for a career-high 335 yards on 26 of 52 attempts, including a 28-yard score to Josh Morgan and ran for touchdowns of 1 & 4 yards … However, he fumbled once, threw an interception and was sacked a career-high six times for minus 35 yards.

Louisville (Gator Bowl) … Led the Hokies to a 35-24 win, as Vick connected on 11 of 21 tosses for 203 yards and a pair of touchdowns … Was sacked three times for losses of 28 yards and fumbled once … With less than 14 minutes left in the game, the Hokies were down, 24-13. Vick then marched the team 78 yards in just two plays. Tech got a big play when Vick hit receiver David Clowney for a 54-yard gain to the Louisville 24. On the next play, tailback Cedric Humes rumbled in from 24 yards out, and the Hokies connected on the two-point conversion when Vick hit Josh Morgan. That made the score 24-21 with just over 13 minutes to go … Tech's Chris Ellis then gave the Hokies' offense a golden opportunity when he drilled QB Hunter Cantwell on the ensuing possession and forced the Louisville signal-caller to fumble. James Anderson recovered for the Hokies, giving Tech the ball at its own 47. Vick then found tight end Jeff King in the back of the end zone on a 5-yard touchdown pass that gave the Hokies a 28-24 lead with 6:09 left in the game … The game was marred by an ugly incident by Vick. Officials never saw Vick's act, which occurred with Louisville leading 17-10 with 1:33 left in the first half. After scrambling for a nine-yard gain, Vick was tackled by defensive end Elvis Dumervil, who led the Division I-A with 20 sacks this season. After Vick stood up, he looked down at Dumervil, raised his right leg and stomped on the back of Dumervil's left knee. Several Louisville coaches -- livid, fingers pointing -- rushed forward onto the playing surface. Dumervil remained prone on the turf, prompting an injury timeout and his removal for a play. Fans sitting in the Louisville seating sections booed when the play was replayed on the video screen on the stadium scoreboard. As the teams left the field at intermission, several Louisville players attempted to go after Vick, but they were blocked by coaches and security personnel. On Tech's sideline, quarterback coach Kevin Rogers watched with more than a hint of chagrin. "Let me put it this way -- he knows there's no room for that in the game," Rogers said. "It's embarrassing. I think it misrepresents who he really is. Very frankly, I was very disappointed. It hurts our program. It hurts him. It was a stupid, knee-jerk reaction."

Rogers ["Obviously, to me it was a flagrant foul"] said he thought Vick would've been flagged or ejected had officials seen the dirty deed. He said he considered yanking Vick from the lineup, "Oh, yeah, it crossed my mind." He was asked if the act took something away from the win. His response: "For me, it does." Dumervil, still apparently steamed, declined to emerge from his locker room to meet Vick and dismissed any contention foot-to-leg contact was inadvertent. "I definitely thought it was intentional," Dumervil told the Louisville Courier-Journal. "My left knee is still hurting. He's just a no-character individual. It could've been my career." … Several days after the incident, Vick was dismissed from the team and school.

2004 Season

Was suspended from all university activities for the fall of 2004 (see Off-Field Issues below) … Returned to the team for the 2005 spring practice.

2003 Season

Played in eleven games as a reserve quarterback … Suspended by head coach Frank Beamer for the James Madison contest due to a team rules violation … Finished with 475 yards, two touchdowns and five interceptions on 30 of 57 passes (52.6 percent) … Gained 102 yards on 37 carries (2.8 avg) and caught four passes for 82 yards (20.5 avg), including a touchdown … Participated in 94 plays, totaling 577 yards … Seven of his pass attempts were deflected … Sacked four times for losses of 29 yards … Fumbled three times, with the opposition recovering one of those miscues.

2003 GAME HIGHLIGHTS

Central Florida … Made his collegiate debut, hitting on 7 of 10 passes for 102 yards and a 27-yard touchdown to David Clowney.

Connecticut … Threw for 59 yards on 4 of 5 attempts.

Rutgers … Intercepted twice and sacked for an 8-yard loss while connecting on 2 of 6 throws for 37 yards.

Miami … Turned the ball over on a fumble from the result of an 8-yard sack, but also threw a 46-yard touchdown to Ernest Wilford.

Pittsburgh … Gained a season-high 147 yards on 8 of 15 throws, but was sacked for a 10-yard loss and also threw a pair of interceptions.

Temple … Fumbled twice and was intercepted once, as he completed 4 of 6 attempts for 61 yards.

California (Insight Bowl) … Saw action as a quarterback and receiver … Under center, he attempted one pass and rushed three times for 28 yards … Caught four passes for 82 yards, including a 36-yard touchdown on a first quarter toss from QB Bryan Randall.

2002 Season

Redshirted as a freshman … Used the season to work on his fundamentals, get stronger and gain a better grasp of the college game.

Injury Report

No injuries reported.

Agility Tests

Campus: 4.33 seconds in the 40-yard dash (indoor rubber track) … 4.48 in the 40-yard dash (outdoor grass surface) … 300-pound bench press … 450-pound squat … 265-pound power clean … 275-pound push jerk … 35-inch vertical jump.

Off-Field Issues

2002: On July 13, Vick is cited for speeding (60 mph in 45-mph zone) in Newport News, Virginia.

On Oct. 11, Vick is again cited for speeding (49 mph in 25-mph zone) in Montgomery County, Virginia.

On Nov. 1, Vick is cited for speeding (44 mph in 25-mph zone) in Blacksburg, Virginia.

2003: On Jan. 30, Vick is cited for driving with a suspended license in Newport News, Virginia.

On Sept. 2, Vick was suspended for the James Madison game (9/06) by head coach Frank Beamer for undisclosed violations of team rules.

2004: On Feb. 17, Vick was arrested without incident and charged with four misdemeanors -- three for allegedly allowing underage girls to have alcohol and one for allegedly having sex with a 15-year-old at a January party. He was released on $2,500 bond. On May 13, Vick was convicted of three counts of contributing to the delinquency of a minor and sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined $2,250. However, he was found innocent of having sex with the 15-year-old.

On July 3, Vick was charged with reckless driving and possession of marijuana after a traffic stop about 25 miles east of Richmond at 2:30 a.m. Police said he was speeding and that the vehicle stunk of marijuana, state police spokesman Lt. Gary B. Payne said. "As a result of the traffic stop, he also was charged with possession of marijuana," Payne said. Both charges are misdemeanors. According to Payne, Vick was stopped by officer Gary Ward early Saturday morning after traveling through police radar at 88 miles an hour -- 23 mph over the speed limit -- on Interstate 64 in New Kent County, Va., near his home of Newport News. Vick was charged with a Class I misdemeanor for reckless driving and another Class I misdemeanor for marijuana possession. Vick was then allowed to leave the scene after signing a summons. "It's very similar to being stopped for speeding," Payne said. "For a Class I misdemeanor, we don't find it necessary to detain the individual. They sign a summons and are released from the scene." Three days later on July 6th, head coach Frank Beamer suspended Vick from the football team for a accumulation of his off-field problems.

On Aug. 3, Vick was suspended from the university for the 2004 season on same day he pleaded guilty to reckless driving and no contest to marijuana possession in New Kent. He was fined $300, had his driver's license suspended for 60 days and wass placed in a first offender program on the marijuana charge, requiring that he perform 24 hours of community service, undergo drug counseling and random drug tests, and give up his driver's license for six months.

On Sept. 13, Vick pleads no contest to one misdemeanor count of contributing to the delinquency of a minor. He receives a 30-day suspended jail sentence, is fined $100, ordered to perform 24 hours of community service and ordered to stay away from the teenage girls.

2005: On Jan. 17, Vick is cleared to rejoin football team and re-enroll at Virginia Tech. "I apologize to my family, my school, teammates, everybody that looked up to me," said Vick, during a news conference after his reinstatement. "I was young. I'm just looking forward to the future. I realize you can't take life for granted."

On Oct. 1, in a game vs. West Virginia, Vick makes an obscene gesture to fans that have been calling him names related to past problems throughout the game. He would then apologize for the incident a day later, saying, "I let my emotions get the best of me." He was also charged with bumping the head of West Virginia assistant coach Tony Gibson with his forearm.

On Dec. 17, Vick is pulled over by police in Hampton, Virginia for driving 38 mph in a 25 mph zone and driving with a suspended license, according to police spokesman Cpl. James West. Head coach Frank Beamer said Vick told him December 19th that he had received a ticket two days earlier for driving with a suspended license. Beamer said he told John Ballein, Tech's associate athletic director for football operations, to investigate the incident. Ballein said Vick's driver's license had been reinstated last year -- it had been suspended after he was stopped in July 2004 in New Kent, Va., for reckless driving and possession of marijuana. But Vick's license was suspended again because the insurance for a car that was registered to him had lapsed because of nonpayment of the premium. Ballein said Vick's friend, whom he didn't identify, had been driving the car. Ballein said Vick has since paid the fine and his license has been reinstated. Vick is scheduled to appear in Hampton District Court on Jan. 17 for the speeding charge -- his ninth driving offense since he enrolled at Virginia Tech in 2002. Beamer said he didn't inform Weaver or Steger about the Dec. 17 incident because he considered the suspended license a "formality" and didn't think it violated the conditions of Vick's reinstatement. Beamer said he didn't know that Vick also had been charged with speeding until Friday. Vick would have been suspended for the first two games of the 2006 season had he returned to Virginia Tech, but university officials decided to dismiss him from the team Friday after they learned of his Dec. 17 traffic stop. Virginia Tech President Charles Steger said during a news conference Saturday that he, Coach Frank Beamer and Athletic Director Jim Weaver had agreed to a two-game suspension, but they ultimately left the decision to Beamer as to whether Vick would return to the team for his senior season.

2006: On Jan. 1 Vick incites the fans, coaches and Louisville players at the Gator Bowl, when he stomped on the left calf of Cardinals All-American defensive end Elvis Dumervil, the NCAA sacks leader. Officials never saw Vick's act, which occurred with Louisville leading 17-10 with 1:33 left in the first half. After scrambling for a nine-yard gain, Vick was tackled by defensive end Elvis Dumervil, who led the Division I-A with 20 sacks this season. After Vick stood up, he looked down at Dumervil, raised his right leg and stomped on the back of Dumervil's left knee. Several Louisville coaches -- livid, fingers pointing -- rushed forward onto the playing surface. Dumervil remained prone on the turf, prompting an injury timeout and his removal for a play. Fans sitting in the Louisville seating sections booed when the play was replayed on the video screen on the stadium scoreboard. As the teams left the field at intermission, several Louisville players attempted to go after Vick, but they were blocked by coaches and security personnel. On Tech's sideline, quarterback coach Kevin Rogers watched with more than a hint of chagrin. "Let me put it this way -- he knows there's no room for that in the game," Rogers said. "It's embarrassing. I think it misrepresents who he really is. Very frankly, I was very disappointed. It hurts our program. It hurts him. It was a stupid, knee-jerk reaction." Vick claims the incident was accidental and that he apologized to Dumervil, but the Louisville defender denies ever receiving apology.

On Jan. 2, Virginia Tech Director of Athletics Jim Weaver issued a statement that read, "The unsportsmanlike conduct of quarterback Marcus Vick in yesterday's Gator Bowl game against Louisville is unacceptable behavior and contrary to the Hokies Respect Campaign. Such on-field action is not reflective of Virginia Tech football nor of the values we hold at Virginia Tech. I and my colleagues in central administration are embarrassed and this athletic administration will not condone such acts of unsportsmanlike conduct. We will review and assess this incident further and deal with it accordingly."

On Jan. 6, Vick's career at Virginia Tech ended after the school dismissed the junior from the football team, citing "a cumulative effect of legal infractions and unsportsmanlike play." When the school announced Vick's suspension in 2004, president Charles M. Steger said if Vick faced additional off-field troubles, "his Virginia Tech career is effectively ended." A statement released by Virginia Tech said: "The university provided one last opportunity for Vick to become a citizen of the university and readmitted him in January 2005, with the proviso that any future problems would result in automatic dismissal from the team." Hokies Coach Frank Beamer met with Vick and his mother, Brenda Boddie, near Hampton Roads, Virginia, and informed them of the school's decision. "I'm very disappointed that this didn't have a better ending," Beamer said in the statement. "We wanted what's best for this football team and Vick. I certainly wish him the best."

A Virginia Tech official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said if Vick had returned to the team, he would have faced a suspension "more severe" than the one-game suspension that some media outlets had reported. A statement from University President Charles Steger read, "Virginia Tech quarterback Marcus Vick has been permanently dismissed from the Hokie football program due to a cumulative effect of legal infractions and unsportsmanlike play."

On Jan. 9, Vick was charged with pulling a gun on three teenagers during an altercation in a restaurant parking lot. Vick surrendered at the Suffolk magistrate's office after three warrants were issued for his arrest Sunday, Magistrate Lisa Noel said.

Vick was charged with three misdemeanor counts of brandishing a firearm, and was released on $10,000 bond. Police said the parents of a 17-year-old boy reported that Vick pointed a weapon at their son and two others during an altercation at a McDonald's in Suffolk, a southeastern Virginia city where Vick's mother lives, Sunday night. If convicted of all three counts, Vick could be sentenced to up to three years in jail and a $7,500 fine, police spokeswoman Lt. Debbie George said in a statement. A Virginia Tech spokesman said university officials would have no comment on Vick's arrest. "At this point, I think the actions speak for themselves," the spokesman, Larry Hincker, said.

High School

Attended Warwick (Newport News, Va.) High School, playing football for head coach Tommy Reamon … Earned All-American honors from Super Prep, Prep Star and Tom Lemming's Prep Football Report … Rated the sixth-best quarterback in the nation by Super Prep and tenth-best by Prep Star … Named to Prep Star's Dream Team and rated the top quarterback in the Atlantic Region by that publication … Compiled over 5,000 yards of total offense during his final two seasons at Warwick … Passed for 1,746 yards and 15 touchdowns as a senior, adding 702 yards and 13 scores on the ground to earn second-team Group AAA All-state honors from the Associated Press … Threw for 2,180 yards and 19 touchdowns as a junior.

Personal

Apparel, Housing and Resource Management major … Younger brother of former Tech All-American quarterback and present Atlanta Falcons standout, Michael Vick … Son of Brenda and Michael Boddie … Born Marcus Deon Vick on 3/20/84 in Newport News, Virginia.

 
 
 

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