Report: Shane Lechler agrees to terms with Texans

By John Breech | CBSSports.com


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Shane Lechler is reportedly leaving Oakland after 13 seasons and headed for Houston. (USATSI)

After 13 seasons with the Raiders, Shane Lechler is leaving Oakland. The free-agent punter has agreed to terms with the Houston Texans, according to John McClain of the Houston Chronicle. ESPN.com's Adam Schefter reported that the deal is worth $5.5 million over three years and includes a $1 million signing bonus.

The seven-time Pro Bowler is one of the most prolific punters in NFL history. Lechler's 47.5-yard career punting average is the second-highest in NFL history, trailing only Jacksonville's Bryan Anger, who only has one season under his belt.

In 2009, Lechler averaged 51.1 yards per punt, the second highest single-season total in NFL history. For his career, Lechler has three of the top eight single-season averages in league history.

The move to Houston will be a homecoming of sorts for Lechler. The 13-year veteran attended high school just outside the city and played collegiately at Texas A&M before being taken by the Raiders in the fifth round of the 2000 NFL Draft.

The Texans could have opted to re-sign free agent punter Donnie Jones, but instead the team elected to go after Lechler.

Keep your eye on everything NFL by following John Breech on Twitter: @JohnBreech.

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