• My Scores
  • NHL
  • NFL
  • NBA
  • Golf
  • NCAA BB
  • NCAA FB

Colts WR Reggie Wayne suffers knee injury against Broncos

By John Breech | CBSSports.com

Reggie Wayne left Sunday's game in the fourth quarter after injuring his knee. (USATSI)
Reggie Wayne left Sunday's game in the fourth quarter after injuring his knee. (USATSI)

Colts wide receiver Reggie Wayne left the field in tears on Sunday night after injuring his right knee against the Broncos. Wayne twisted his knee as he was lunging for a ball thrown by Colts quarterback Andrew Luck.

On a third-and-1 play with just over seven minutes left in the fourth quarter, Luck threw a low pass to a wide open Wayne, but Wayne was unable to make the catch because he injured himself right before the ball got to him. Wayne stumbled to the ground and immediately grabbed for his right knee.

After the game, Luck took the blame for Wayne's injury, "It was my fault," Luck said. "Terrible throw. We know he's a fighter. We're hoping for the best."

According to NBC, Wayne was fighting back tears as he left the field. The injury looked serious, but the Colts won't know anything for sure until Wayne has an MRI done and that's been scheduled for Monday.

The NFL's reigning iron man, Wayne hasn't missed a game since his rookie year in 2001. The 13-year veteran has played in 189 consecutive games, the longest streak among active players.

Wayne finished the game with five catches for 50 yards as the Colts went on to upset Peyton Manning and the Broncos 39-33.

CBSSports Facebook Google Plus
COMMENTS
Conversation powered by Livefyre
NEVER MISS A MOCK DRAFT
Sign up to our newsletter and find out who your team could be picking
 

nfl Video

December 17, 2014
Eagles at Redskins Preview (2:26)
December 17, 2014
Chargers at 49ers Preview
(2:48)
December 17, 2014
Lions at Bears Preview
(2:48)
December 17, 2014
Falcons at Saints Preview
(2:56)

Latest

Most Popular

CBSSports.com Shop

College Bowl Bound

Free Shipping over $50 order!
Use code SHIPNOW
Get their favorite team
Shop Now