Crisis averted? Here's what actually went wrong at the 2016 Rio Olympics

Leading up to the 2016 Rio Olympics, there were many reasons to be concerned.

Security, the Zika virus and polluted water were just a few of the issues that surrounded the games. But here we are, almost a full day removed from competition, and you'd be hard pressed to find anyone who would describe the games as the disaster some expected them to be.

Things weren't perfect in Rio, but the Olympics are never perfect. Here's a quick rundown of the things that actually went wrong at the Rio Games.

The water turned green

Everyone was apparently so worried about the sewage-filled bay that they forgot about the pool. The Olympic diving competition started with pristine, well-maintained, crystal-clear pools full of blue water. But overnight one of the pools turned into a murky green mess. At first no explanation was given, but it was later revealed that the maintenance crew had mistakenly poured 160 liters of hydrogen peroxide into the pool. The chemical neutralized the chlorine in the pool, leading to the growth of "organic compounds" that included algae. Even worse, somebody also dumped 160 liters of hydrogen peroxide onto Ryan Lochte's head.

Some boxing judges were sent home for being terrible

One of the more memorable post-match moments of the games came when Irish boxer Michael Conlan went on a profanity-laced tirade after what he thought was an unfair decision in his match against Vladimir Nikitin. Soon after, an unspecified number of referees and judges were sent home by the International Boxing Association after a review found that "less than a handful of the decisions were not at the level expected." That didn't help Conlan though, who took his f-bombs back to Ireland.

conlancursesoutjudges.jpg
Michael Conlan gives a piece of his mind to the boxing judges. Getty Images

The hills caught fire

The mountain biking and BMX competitions were put in danger when a brush fire took over the Deodoro parkland, where the events were held. Mountain bikers were evacuated from the area, and ash from the wildfire reportedly littered the Olympic field hockey playing surface. Fortunately the fire was detained and the events went on as planned.

A camera fell from the sky

Who would have thought the most dangerous things flying around in Rio wouldn't be Zika-carrying mosquitoes? Several people were injured when a television camera fell more than 60 feet to the ground outside the basketball venue. One bystander said the object "looked like a flying saucer coming through the air" before it struck two women. The seven people who were injured were quickly released from care, but probably had their heads on a swivel for the remainder of the games.

A British guy got robbed

Amidst the whole Lochte saga, a report came out that a member of Great Britain's Olympic team was actually robbed in Rio de Janeiro. In stark contrast to the Americans, the British were noticeably scant with details -- all the British Olympic Association said was that there was an "incident involving theft" and that the individual involved was "safe and well." What are you hiding, Great Britain?

A kayaker may or may not have capsized after hitting a couch

Just as the games began, a report spread that a kayaker had run over a submerged couch in Guanabara Bay and capsized into the sewage-laden water. The matter is a topic of debate, but most agree that the alleged couch incident probably never happened. Or is that just what the couch wants you to think?

riocouch082216.jpg
There were reports of a kayaker hitting a submerged couch in Rio. Getty Images

So, all things considered, the Rio Games were pretty much a success. There were no reports of a massive Zika outbreak and we only had one (possibly) factual account of a robbery. As long as you stayed away from the fiery hills and avoided falling flying saucers, you were in pretty good shape.

And with that, the Olympics closes the chapter on Rio and moves to South Korea. Your move, PyeongChang.

Show Comments Hide Comments
CBS Sports Shop
2016 Olympics
Our Latest Stories