San Diego bowl group terminates Poinsettia Bowl to focus on one bowl game

Say what you will about poor attendance and "participation trophies," but the number of bowl games has increased in recent years, not decreased. So it's rare when a bowl announces it is shutting it down for good.

But that's exactly what's happening with the San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl. A statement from the San Diego Bowl Game Association said Tuesday that the board of directors will "amend its focus and produce just one post-season college football game in 2017." That, of course, will be the Holiday Bowl. As such, the Poinsettia Bowl is no more, effective immediately. BYU won the final edition of the game over Wyoming, 24-21.

Speaking of which, BYU now has no bowl tie-in for 2017 or '18, as the Cougars had an agreement to play in the Poinsettia Bowl in '16 and '18.

Though San Diego was one of the few cites over the years to host two bowl games, the Holiday Bowl has a much lengthier and more prestigious history than the Poinsettia Bowl. The former has been played for the better part of 40 years and hosted BYU in 1984 with the Cougars being named national champions.

Moving forward, the Holiday Bowl could be moved to Petco Park, home of the San Diego Padres, with the potential closure of Qualcomm Stadium after 2018. The San Diego Chargers, who have used Qualcomm, are moving to Los Angeles.

"The Holiday Bowl brings tourism, economic activity and pride to San Diego year after year. Focusing resources on just one event will ensure that the Holiday Bowl remains a top-tier attraction," said San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer in the release. "I am excited to have started discussions this week with the Bowl Game Association and the Padres about the possibility of bringing the Holiday Bowl to Petco Park. We remain fully committed to supporting this fantastic game."

The Poinsettia Bowl had a 12-year run beginning in 2005.

CBS Sports Writer

Ben Kercheval joined CBS Sports in 2016 and has been covering college football since 2010. Before CBS, Ben worked at Bleacher Report, UPROXX Sports and NBC Sports. As a long-suffering North Texas graduate,... Full Bio

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