Tiger Woods' name dropped from wrongful death lawsuit involving employee at his restaurant

Some bounds were apparently overstepped in a wrongful death lawsuit in Florida where the parents of a man named Nicholas Immesberger are seeking restoration for the death of their son.

The original lawsuit -- filed after Immesberger died in a car wreck following a night of drinking at Tiger Woods' restaurant, The Woods Jupiter, in Jupiter, Florida -- was against Tiger, his restaurant and his girlfriend (and general manager of the restaurant) Erica Herman. But that has since been reduced to a lawsuit against just The Woods Jupiter and Herman.

"The decision (by the estate) was clearly appropriate and reflected the fact that Mr. Woods should not have been included in the lawsuit in the first place because he had nothing to do with Mr. Immesberger's death," Woods' lawyer Barry Postman wrote in a statement.

Here's the South Florida Sun Sentinel with more

In a pleading filed June 5, Woods' legal team had asked the court to dismiss the lawsuit against him and prevent it from ever being re-filed. Woods' lawyers accused the other side of making improper legal claims "in a rush to sue a public figure."

"There is no factual or legal basis for naming Mr. Woods as a defendant in this lawsuit," wrote the lawyers from the firm Cole, Scott & Kissane. "Mr. Woods does not work at or own the restaurant nor was he present on the day of the accident."

It seemed odd that Woods would be sued when he wasn't even there and is not an employee, but then again Herman was reportedly not there that night either. The argument of the entire suit is that because Immesberger was an employee of The Woods Jupiter and also was a known alcoholic, his co-workers should not have served him as much as they did. That obviously doesn't directly involve Tiger, although Immesberger's lawyers originally argued that it did, according to the South Florida Sun Sentinel.

In the initial lawsuit against Woods, it claimed "Tiger was directly responsible for ensuring that his employees and management at his Flagship Restaurant were not over serving its employees/customers."

Immesberger crashed on Dec. 10, 2018, with a blood alcohol of .256.

CBS Sports Writer

Kyle Porter began his sports writing career with CBS Sports in 2012. He covers golf, writes poetry about Rory McIlroy's swing, stays ready on Tiger watch and loves the Masters more than anyone you know.... Full Bio

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