The single-season home run leader for each MLB team: Soler, Alonso and others on pace to become new record holders

Home runs have been surging for years and this season in particular it's on overdrive. Instead of talking about the baseballs or whatever else, let's have a little fun and focus on some records set to topple. Specifically, we've already looked at Pete Alonso looking to take down the Mets' record, so let's go team-by-team and take a look at which ones might fall. 

You're going down

The record of Steve Balboni's 36 was long standing, but Moose's record is gonna fall after just two years. It might simply be a matter of days. This is going to happen and it's likely to happen soon. The only way it doesn't is if Soler gets injured. 


  • Team record: Todd Hundley (1996) and Carlos Beltran (2006), 41
  • Season leader: Pete Alonso, 38

Again, this is probably a matter of days. Maybe weeks. But it's going down unless Alonso does, especially now that he's hitting again after a brief slump. 


  • Team record: Troy Glaus, 47 in 2000
  • Season leader: Mike Trout, 39

It's not as much a sure thing as the two above, but I think this one is cooked. Trout will get to 50 and check off yet another box on his Hall of Fame career.    


Fielder's record is gonna fall. The Brewers have 21 home games left and Yelich hasn't hit fewer than seven homers in a month since July of last season. He's more than a month and a half to hit 12.   


  • Team record: Shawn Green, 49 in 2001
  • Season leader: Cody Bellinger, 39

Though he's slowed down from his absurd first month, I like Bellinger to get to 50. It's kind of weird a storied franchise like this has never seen a 50-homer season, no? 
It's possible

This is a fun one. Killebrew holds the franchise's top six home run seasons with 49 (twice), 48, 46, 45 and 44. It would take a run, especially since Cruz is again on the injured list, but there's a chance to carve into history here. It's a bummer on Cruz. He's already missed over 30 games, but he does hit them in bunches. Eddie Rosario with 25 also had an injury rob his chances.   

Big-time longshots

  • Team record: David Ortiz, 54 in 2006
  • Season leader: J.D. Martinez, 28

I can't see this happening, but Martinez hit 29 homers in 62 games for the D-Backs in 2017. He'd have to get way hotter to get this one, but I'm not prepared to say this is a zero percent chance. It's probably around one percent. 


  • Team record: Jeff Bagwell, 47 in 2000
  • Season leader: Alex Bregman, 28

Don't even think about betting on this, but I'm not gonna say there's no chance. I don't think there's a zero percent chance Bregs hits 20 homers in six-plus weeks.   


  • Team record: Andruw Jones, 51 in 2005
  • Season leader: Ronald Acuna, 34

Acuna is gonna hit more than 40. Maybe 45. I won't count the wunderkind out, but it's a huge hill to climb.   


  • Team record: George Foster, 52 in 1977
  • Season leader: Eugenio Suarez, 33 

Suarez plays in a park conducive to homers and he's on a tear right now, with 13 homers since the All-Star break, including four in his last six games. Getting to Foster is a tall order, but there's a small chance here. Hell, at this rate maybe Aristides Aquino gets there. I might not be kidding.   


  • Team record: Greg Vaughn, 50 in 1998
  • Season leader: Hunter Renfroe, 31

The next highest total for a Padres player after Vaughn's record is 41, so I think Renfroe ends up second in franchise history.    

No chance

They are going to set some records as a team and have ridiculous power, but it's well-distributed. Gleyber Torres leads the club with 26 homers. He's not getting to Roger Maris' 61, nor is anyone else. At least not this year (I wouldn't count out Aaron Judge or Giancarlo Stanton in the next few years if they can stay healthy).

The Rays have nine players in double digits in homers, but none of them have more than 20. Austin Meadows leads with exactly 20. The club record is 46 (Carlos Pena, 2007).

Jose Bautista's 54 is safe. Randal Grichuk leads this team with 22.

Trey Mancini has 29 and might end up around 40, which is a really nice season. Chris Davis hit 53 in 2013, though.

Carlos Santana is having a monster season and leads his team with 27 homers. The club record is Jim Thome's 52 in 2002.

Albert Belle's 49 (1998) is safe. Jose Abreu leads the Sox with 24.

I think Hank Greenberg's 58 is out of reach. Maybe, possibly. Can you name the team leader off the top of your head here? He has 14. It's Brandon Dixon.

Jimmie Foxx's 58 in 1932 has really stood the test of time. It's not going anywhere this year, either. Matt Chapman leads the A's with 25.

Unfortunately, the Joey Gallo injury put a damper on things here. A-Rod's 57 from 2002 is gonna stand. Gallo still leads the Rangers with 22 and probably wasn't getting there anyway.

Inner-circle Hall of Famer Ken Griffey Jr. twice hit 56. I love me some Daniel Vogelbach, but he has 26 right now and he doesn't have 30 more coming.

Anthony Rendon is having a ridiculous season, but he's "only" at 25 homers. Alfonso Soriano hit 46 in 2006.

Ryan Howard hit 58 in 2006. Rhys Hoskins or Bryce Harper might make a run at some point soon, but this season they are at 24 and 22, respectively.

Giancarlo Stanton hit 59 in 2017. Nothing to see here.

Javier Baez and Kyle Schwarber could get to 40, but there was this Sammy Sosa guy who topped 60 three times.

Gonna go out on a limb and guess Mark McGwire's 70 stands for a while.

I would love to see Josh Bell make a run, but he's at 30 and Ralph Kiner's club record is 54. I'm just not seeing it.

Luis Gonzalez's 57 is safe. Eduardo Escobar leads the Snakes with 26 right now.

Kevin Pillar leads the team with 15. He needs 58 more to get to Barry Bonds' MLB record. That would be quite a run.

Believe it or not, no Rockies player has ever hit 50 homers in a season. Both Larry Walker and Todd Helton got to 49. The team leader this year is Trevor Story at 27. I'm not seeing 23 more.

So there you have it. I'm picking five franchise records in single-season home runs to topple this season. That's pretty significant. Plus, now you know every franchise's record. You're welcome. 

CBS Sports Writer

Matt Snyder has been a baseball writer with CBS Sports since 2011. A member of the BBWAA, he's now covered every World Series since 2010. The former Indiana University baseball player now lives on the... Full Bio

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