Kobe gives thoughts on LaVar's Big Baller Brand: 'I'm all for doing things differently'

Whether he's ready or not, Lonzo Ball has become the face of the Los Angeles Lakers franchise, a position that Kobe Bryant left open when he retired after the 2015-16 season. Unlike Kobe, however, Lonzo comes as a package deal with his outspoken father, LaVar, whose controversial statements have been making headlines for the better part of a year now.

One of LaVar's biggest initiatives was getting Lonzo to represent their family-run Big Baller Brand rather than signing with bigger apparel companies like Nike, Adidas or Under Armour. Bryant, who has become much more involved in business after retirement through his company, Kobe Inc., recently sat down with CNBC and discussed LaVar's decision to launch the Big Baller Brand.

While Bryant doesn't disagree with taking on "the big guys," he stresses the importance of the quality of the product. Via CNBC

"I'm all for doing things differently," Bryant said. "I just think you have to obsess over every single detail about that product ... Before getting into the marketing and the storytelling of it all, you have to get the product right.

"That's how you challenge the big guys, with innovation and high-quality product. Then you give yourself a serious fighting chance."

LaVar made a splash in May when the Big Baller Brand released Lonzo's first signature shoe, the ZO2, with a price point of $495 -- more than a month before Lonzo was selected in the NBA Draft. Then in September, the BBB announced a redesign of the ZO2, with LaVar saying that he wasn't worried about refunds.

Kobe's comments about quality may be a reaction to when LaVar, shortly after the launch of the ZO2, said that the shoe was nothing more than "stitching and glue" and that "it's not a science project."

Meanwhile on the court, Lonzo shook off a brutal debut to fill the stat sheet with 29 points, 11 rebounds and nine assists against the Phoenix Suns on Friday in his second career NBA game. For the record, Kobe didn't top the 29-point mark until his second NBA season, but he was still younger than Lonzo when he did it.

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