Jawaan Taylor NFL Draft profile: Everything to know about pro day, measurements, strengths, team fits

Jawaan Taylor is a right tackle who dominates in the run game and is also a surprisingly good pass protector.  At 6-5, 312 pounds, he's a mountain of a human being who not only anchors well, but regularly out-muscles defensive lineman lined up across from him.  

College career

Taylor originally committed to the University of Miami before but switched to the University of Florida where he started 12 games at right tackle as a freshman in 2016. He started 11 games at right tackle and two games at left tackle in 2017, and was a 12-game starter at right tackle last season before declaring for the NFL Draft.

Among all FBS offensive tackles, Taylor ranked 10th in Pro Football Focus' pass-blocking-efficiency metric and was successful on run-blocking plays 92.4 percent of the time. 

Combine/pro day results

MeasurementResult

Height:

6-foot-5

Weight:

312 pounds

Arms:

35 1/8 inches

Hands:

10 inches

WorkoutResult

40-yard dash:

--

Bench press:

24

Vertical jump:

--

Broad jump:

--

3-cone drill:

--

20-yard shuttle:

--

60-yard shuttle:

--

Taylor took part in the blocking drills at the combine and looks sharp:

Strengths/weaknesses

Strengths: Taylor shows a consistent anchor, good footwork and rarely gets caught overextending in his pass sets. He's also a dominant run blocker who displays good hand usage and long arms. 

Here's Taylor doing just fine against Kentucky's Josh Allen, a top-5 pick in the upcoming draft:

Weaknesses: Taylor can be susceptible to the bull rush but has the strength to regain his balance and hold his ground. Even when he's beaten inside, he has the athleticism to recover.  Taylor can get grabby when defender gets him off-balance, or isn't where he expects the defender to be, especially on running plays.

NFL comparison

From CBS Sports NFL draft analyst Chris Trapasso:

Trent Williams. Williams was picked in the first round of the 2010 draft after a dazzling career at Oklahoma in which he showcased franchise tackle power in the run game and ideal fundamentals with his hands and feet to be an above-average pass protector. Since then, he's become one of the most well-rounded tackles in football. Taylor is a wide, heavy-handed blocker who will drive opponents into the ground in the run game and uses his smooth athleticism to deal with speed rushers. Power rushers don't give him issues. Like Williams was, Taylor can be tested by quick, low-to-the-ground defenders because he's not an elite athlete, but don't mistake Taylor for a plodding tackle prospect.    

NFL teams in play to draft Taylor

Jaguars: Jacksonville has its franchise quarterback in Nick Foles and protecting him seems like the next logical step. Left tackle Cam Robinson, who played in just two games last season because of injury, will be ready to go in 2019 and Taylor would be a sensible bookend, helping not only Foles but a running game that lost its way last season with Leonard Fournette.

Bills: The team signed Ty Nsekhe during free agency but he's 33 years old. Taylor would be a critical cog in not only protecting franchise quarterback Josh Allen but in anchoring the run game.

Packers: Green Bay has needs at wide receiver and tight end but protecting Aaron Rodgers is near the top of the to-do list, especially since Bryan Bulaga is in the final year of his deal.

Dolphins: Ryan Fitzpatrick is the short-term solution at quarterback and he'll need to be protected. Taylor could be the first offensive lineman taken and it would make perfect sense; he's a monster in the run game and was rarely fooled in pass protection last season. Laremy Tunsil is the left tackle but the Dolphins need to upgrade the right side.

Vikings: Kirk Cousins had an uneven debut season for the Vikings. And while he deserved some of the blame, Minnesota's porous offensive line did him no favors. 

Texans: Deshaun Watson was sacked 62 times last season. Houston has to address the offensive line. 

CBS Sports Writer

Ryan Wilson has been an NFL writer for CBS Sports since June 2011, and he's covered five Super Bowls in that time. Ryan previously worked at AOL's FanHouse from start to finish, and Football Outsiders... Full Bio

Our Latest Stories