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USATSI

After 15 former Washington employees told the Washington Post that they were sexually harassed during their time with the club, Washington football team owner Daniel Snyder released a statement Friday on the allegations regarding the culture of the franchise over the last several years. 

"The behavior described in yesterday's Washington Post article has no place in our franchise or society," Snyder said in his statement. "This story has strengthened my commitment to setting a new culture and standard for our team, a process that began with the hiring of Coach (Ron) Rivera earlier this year. 

"Beth Wilkinson and her firm are empowered to do a full, unbiased investigation and make any and all requisite recommendations. Upon completion of her work, we will institute new policies and procedures and strengthen our human resources infrastructure to not only avoid these issues in the future, but most importantly create a team culture that is respectful and inclusive of all." 

Three team employees accused of improper behavior have abruptly departed the organization. Snyder's statement comes hours after the NFL released a statement on Friday that suggested potential punishment could bear down on the Washington franchise.

"These matters as reported are serious, disturbing and contrary to the NFL's values," the league's statement reads. "Everyone in the NFL has the right to work in an environment free from any and all forms of harassment. Washington has engaged outside of counsel to conduct a thorough investigation into these allegations. The club has pledged that it will give its full cooperation to the investigator and we expect the club and all employees to do so. We will meet with the attorneys upon the conclusion of their investigation and take any action based on the findings."

Rivera, who has a major influence on helping Washington choose a new team name (which still has yet to be announced), also said "we have policies that we will follow and that we have an open door policy with no retribution."

In The Post article, the former female employees didn't directly accuse Snyder of misconduct, but the behavior took place under his watch. Snyder has owned the Washington franchise since 1999.