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Jadeveon Clowney still doesn't have a new team three weeks into NFL free agency, but that could change soon if he's willing to change his approach and it sounds like he finally is ready to do that. Per ESPN's Jeremy Fowler, Clowney is willing to take a one-to-two year deal to "try to get his sack numbers up" and hit the market next offseason since he couldn't get the $20 million a year contract he was seeking earlier in March.

Clowney has 32 sacks in six NFL seasons with 80 quarterback hits, 252 pressures and three Pro Bowl appearances.  While the resume is impressive, Clowney had just three sacks in his lone season with the Seattle Seahawks in 2019. Playing through a core muscle injury didn't help Clowney, even though he finished with 31 tackles, four forced fumbles, 13 quarterback hits and 47 pressures in 13 games.

Clowney has never recorded a double-digit sack season, finishing with a career-high 9.5 in 2017. His second-highest total is nine in 2018, even though Clowney had 75 pressures that year. Clowney's history of injuries hasn't helped his case, as the edge rusher has played all 16 games in a season just once in six seasons and missed a combined 21 games over the course of his career. 

Clowney has reportedly lowered his asking price from north of $20 million per season to $17-18 million, which still may be the deal he's seeking -- just for a short-term commitment. The Cleveland Browns have reportedly entered the sweepstakes for Clowney over the weekend and appeared to be the closest team toward landing a deal for him, per Fowler. The Seahawks appear to be out of the running, as the chances are "slim to none" that Clowney re-signs with Seattle, per NFL Network's Mike Garafolo. 

Cleveland has the most cap space in the NFL at $43 million and can create much more by parting ways with edge rusher Olivier Vernon (who can be released from his $15.5 million salary cap hit without any penalty). The Browns certainly have the finances to give Clowney want he wants, but a short-term deal may be enough to keep both parties happy.