Las Vegas woman says ex-Dolphins coach used her as a 'cocaine platter'

More details continue to emerge regarding former Dolphins offensive line coach Chris Foerster and the video he sent to a Las Vegas model Kijuana Njie in which he was seen snorting a white, powdered substance before heading into a team meeting.

The video blew up on Sunday night after Njie posted it on social media, at which time the Dolphins started investigating it. By Monday morning, Foerster had resigned his position with the team. You can watch the video here.

Later Monday, Njie revealed on social media that she had released the video because she was unhappy with the way the NFL was treating protesting players. But in an interview with the "Dan LeBatard Show" on ESPN Radio on Wednesday, Njie said she released the video because she was worried Foerster "low-key threatened" her about exposing the video.

"He basically sent me a message saying anything I planned to do or tried to harm him will be turned over to his job's security team," Njie said, via the Miami Herald. "After he sent the video, he came off his high and low-key kind of threatened me if I ended up exposing the information. Before he could do anything to me, I felt that needed to be exposed. 

"Just in case I somehow pop up dead, that story was still going to get out."

According to Njie, she and Foerster met for the first time back when the Dolphins were practicing out in California before playing the Chargers in Week 1. At the time Foerster was looking for "entertainment."

"He was calling for entertainment," Njie said. "He did mention he wanted to party. We met multiple times. Chris Foerster used me as his cocaine platter. ... I was dating him."

A lot to unpack there. Also: Njie said that while she "cares" about the Dolphins coach, she also believes strongly she needed to take him down to "expose the inequalities in the system."

"My motive was to basically expose the inequalities in the system," Njie said. "It's not just the NFL. The inequalities that come with being a minority compared with a white privileged person in America in general. This is shining light on the inequalities we have as a country. We don't get paid the same amount as everyone else.

"To be completely honest, me and my best friend actually already had plans to record him someway regardless to expose him. Even if he didn't send that video, it was going to be exposed because it needed to be exposed.

"How do we have someone who is paid millions to be a leader for a team doing blow when we can't have blacks kneeling for the anthem. After I realized his habits and who he was and everything going on the system, he was going to get exposed."

As a result of her comments and her decision to expose Foerster, Njie said that she has received death threats from various people, although roughly 70 percent of the people commenting on the situation are supporting her.

Njie also added that she has more footage of Foerster, which she plans to expose at some point in time and, while she never saw any other members of the Dolphins team hanging around and doing drugs with Foerster, he "spoke to" her about "other people."

"When we were together, there was no one else around," Njie said. "But he spoke to me about other people."

CBS Sports Senior Writer

Will Brinson joined CBS Sports in 2010 and enters his seventh season covering the NFL for CBS. He previously wrote for FanHouse along with myriad other Internet sites. A North Carolina native who lives... Full Bio

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