The Chargers L.A. trademark is being opposed by this '90s shoe manufacturer

Any child of the '90s knows there's only one brand brave enough to venture into the world of light-up athletic shoes. And that brand, L.A. Gear, is trying to stop the Chargers from trademarking their name and logo.

The Chargers, who announced Thursday they would move to Los Angeles beginning in 2017, unveiled a new logo along with the announcement. It was met with the proper derision on social media, what with it looking like a Dodgers logo on a heavy dose of methamphetamines.

la-chargers-new-logo.jpg
via Twitter

There are some problematic issues with the logo from an artistic standpoint (namely: it's terrible). But there's some issues when it comes to the Chargers trademark as well.

Naturally any team that files a patent or trademark with the United States Patent and Trademark Office is seeking to sell athletic gear. The L.A. Chargers are no different and their trademark included filing for:

Clothing, footwear and headwear, namely, caps, hats, visors, headbands, ear muffs, wristbands, tops, T-shirts, tank tops, sleepwear, golf shirts, sweaters, sweatshirts, turtlenecks, jackets, neckties, bibs not of paper, jerseys, coats, robes, ponchos, sneakers, gloves, scarves, mittens, aprons, shorts, sweatpants, jeans, pants, socks, underwear, swimwear, rompers

The issue here is that L.A. Gear's been in the game for a lot longer, selling the same stuff with a pretty similar looking name and logo.

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via LAGear.com

Now, no one with a brain is going to confuse L.A. Gear with the L.A. Chargers. The Chargers are a football team that wastes the career of Philip Rivers and gags away late leads. L.A. Gear is a brand of footwear that lights up in the back. (Although maybe there's a correlation here ...)

However, in the interest of selling athletic apparel, a.k.a., gear, it would be understandable that L.A. Gear wouldn't be thrilled about its already waning sales potentially taking a hit because of the Chargers similar logo.

So they filed an opposition to the Chargers patent, noting that the Chargers' "applied-for mark is confusingly similar to the marks of Opposer identified hereinabove."

Additionally because the two will be offered to the "same class of consumers" L.A. Gear is claiming that the Chargers marks are "likely to cause confusion, or cause to mistake, or to deceive as to the source of the goods."

The Chargers have since come out and said that the L.A. logos are simply for marketing and won't be on any uniforms. So they'll probably find something new to use instead.

It's pretty obvious the franchise didn't do its due diligence in terms of competition for the marks, however, which shouldn't be a surprise given how this has gone down.

CBS Sports Senior Writer

Will Brinson joined CBS Sports in 2010 and enters his seventh season covering the NFL for CBS. He previously wrote for FanHouse along with myriad other Internet sites. A North Carolina native who lives... Full Bio

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