A Canadian man is upset at the organizers of a youth hockey tournament in British Columbia after his grandson bid for and won $200 worth of marijuana products in a raffle. The group of products, collected in a gift basket, were available during a fundraising auction for a youth tournament at Dawson Creek Minor Hockey.

"Each team is usually responsible for putting a gift basket or prize package together with a minimum value of $50," Keith Redl, the eight-year-old's grandfather, told CTVNews. "And then what they do is they have a big setup and they have a paper bag taped in front of each one of these prizes."

At the end of the tournament, the boy's father received a call informing him that he had won the prize. When he picked up the haul, he saw pieces of chocolate, vanilla chai, and other snacks stamped with Canada's red, octagonal THC symbol for legal cannabis. There was also a pipe and a lighter included.

Redl is a former police officer so he was unsurprisingly upset that his grandson was able to bid and win on such a prize. But in a statement to CTVNews.ca, the Dawson Creek Minor Hockey Association said that there were clear signs about the prize being for adults only. They also said that the products were never out in the open around kids, as "only a photo and list of the items contained in the basket" were on the table. Additionally, the person picking up the prize -- in this case, the eight-year-old's dad -- had the option of declining the prize entirely.

"The winner chose to take the prize, their identification was checked to ensure they were of legal age (19+), and the donor then delivered the basket to the winners," the statement said. 

"It was not our intention to upset any of the attendees at the event. The tournament is organized by volunteers and their objective is to have a fun tournament and raise money for DCMHA to allow hockey to be more affordable and more inclusive."

Perhaps the worst part about this whole incident is that the eight-year-old winner feels as though he was deprived of delicious treats. In his eyes, he only saw the chocolate goodies, never making the connection that they were intended for adults, and as a result, according to his grandfather, "he was mad."