The Bundesliga gave fans a taste of what top-level soccer will look like during the coronavirus pandemic with six games played across the country in empty venues, and we also got our first taste of what in-game and post-game celebrations may look like moving forward. The six matches on the day brought a total of 15 goals and some interesting forms of celebration with the league asking players not to get too close when unnecessary and to practice social distancing. 

Some players, however, weren't able to follow the guidelines or contain themselves after scoring. Just look at Hertha Berlin defender Dedryck Boyata kissing midfielder Marko Grujic to celebrate an own goal against Hoffenheim.

FBL-GER-BUNDESLIGA-HOFFENHEIM-HERTHA BERLIN
Hertha's Belgian defender Dedryck Boyata (L) talks to teammate Serbian midfielder Marko Grujic during the German first division Bundesliga football match TSG 1899 Hoffenheim v Hertha Berlin on May 16, 2020 in Sinsheim south-western Germany as the season resumed following a two-month absence due to the novel coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by THOMAS KIENZLE / various sources / AFP) / DFL REGULATIONS PROHIBIT ANY USE OF PHOTOGRAPHS AS IMAGE SEQUENCES AND/OR QUASI-VIDEO (Photo by THOMAS KIENZLE/AFP via Getty Images) Getty Images

It's a good thing the league won't punish the players for getting too close and personal during celebrations.

As for the rest of the action, the first goal of the day came from Dortmund's rising superstar Erling Haaland, who put away a ball after Julian Brandt's lovely touch sent Thorgan Hazard into the final third. The Belgian international then served a pass on a platter around a defender to Haaland, who made no mistake with it in a 4-0 win for his 10th goals in nine league games. Haaland went with a little dance-type move after the goal, standing a few yards from his teammates while doing it, bringing back memories of middle school dances where teachers would get upset if you got too close. Take a look:

Hazard also scored and opened his arms toward where the fans usually sit, but then the entire team went down to the stands after the game  in a comedic moment to applaud one of the ends of the stadium. Usually packed with thousands, they just applauded nobody, acting as if fans were there. Take a look:

Marcus Thuram of Borussia Monchengladbach also got in on the celebrations as he put his team up 2-0 against Eintracht Frankfurt, not touching his teammates initially, opting for a "Fortnite" celebration of running in place and raising his arms before going with the elbow bump.

The more tamed celebrations included just elbow bumps with teammates, fist pumps and little else. As for coaches, they got to experience what interviews are looking like going forward with a mic being held in their face from yards away.

It's different, very different. But hey, at least its live soccer from one of the biggest of leagues, right?