Women's World Cup Spygate? England coach Phil Neville questions USWNT hotel 'etiquette' before semifinal

The coach of the England women's national team claims the United States breached hotel "etiquette" leading up to Tuesday's monumental Women's World Cup semifinal showdown in Lyon, France -- which you can stream via fuboTV (Try for free). It's being dubbed as the "spygate" scandal of the Women's World Cup after two U.S. team representatives were spotted inside the England team hotel, but that appears to be completely off the mark. 

Here's what England coach Phil Neville had to say about the incident during Sunday's press conference:

"It's not something that I would want my team ops person doing," Neville told the media. "It's not something that England would do. We're happy with our hotel. Well, we were training. I hope they enjoyed the hotel. It's not something that we'd do, send somebody around to another team's hotel. But, it's their problem. I'm sure [USA coach] Jill [Ellis] probably wouldn't have been happy with that arrangement. I wouldn't have been if that was my team ops person going around. I'm sure she will be dealing with their own infrastructure within their own discipline probably.

"It's not an unfair advantage. It'll have no bearing on the game. I actually found it quite funny. I just thought, 'What are they doing?' It's not etiquette really, is it? So that's not something that I would allow from our organization."

The semifinal between the United States and England is being played at the Parc Olympique Lyonnais, the same stadium in which the final will be played five days later. FIFA dictates hotel arrangements whether home or away, and if the U.S. beats England on Tuesday, the team will be required to move into the hotel in which England is staying. The staffers were scoping out the hotel, as Ellis told the media.

"I assume everybody's doing that, you have to plan ahead," Ellis said at a press conference on Sunday. "The only two people that think planning ahead on my team is my administrator -- she has to book all the flights and everything -- and her boss. And everybody else, yeah well they don't worry about that. That's probably who the two people were. It's important to do your job."

So basically, it's a non issue and one that seems to have been greatly blown out of proportion. This wasn't the U.S. sending people to England's training or anything that would excite a Marcelo Bielsa.

Carry on. 

CBS Sports Writer

Roger Gonzalez is an award-winning writer based in Virginia that has covered pro soccer from Europe's top clubs to Argentina's first division. Roger started out his pro soccer writing career with Goal.com... Full Bio

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