Astros shortstop Carlos Correa says broken rib was caused by in-home massage

News broke earlier Wednesday that Astros star shortstop Carlos Correa is due to miss four-to-six weeks with a broken rib. All we knew at the time was that Correa wasn't with his team at the ballpark and that his manager didn't say how the injury happened. That remains the case leading up to Wednesday's game: 

Correa, though, has issued a statement. And, well, hold onto your hats: 

"I'm extremely disappointed about not being on the field with my teammates. I sustained the rib fracture during a massage at my home on Tuesday. To sustain an injury in such an unusual way makes it even more frustrating. However, I will work hard to get back on the field as quickly as possible to help our team achieve our goal of winning another championship."

There's further mention that Correa isn't at the ballpark due to being instructed to limit his movement which, with a broken rib, makes sense. 

What kind of doesn't is that it happened during the massage. A broken rib from a massage? Lord, how strong was the masseur/masseuse? Correa is listed at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds. He's a strong 24-year-old professional athlete. He's not brittle. Holy smokes that had to be the most violent massage of all-time, right? 

Honestly, though, I don't think he's lying. Surely, if he was trying to lie about an injury his public relations contacts would ask him to come up with something more believable. And, really, what if he fell or the massage table broke or something. 

We all know we've heard just as crazy, from the Sammy Sosa "violent sneeze" to Jeremy Affeldt slicing open a hand while trying to separate frozen hamburger patties to Francisco Liriano fracturing his femur while (playfully) scaring to his kids to the Kerry Wood hot tub fall to -- most notoriously -- the Glenallen Hill spider story. 

Join the club, Carlos Correa, regardless of how the massage injury happened. 

CBS Sports Writer

Matt Snyder has been a baseball writer with CBS Sports since 2011. A member of the BBWAA, he's now covered every World Series since 2010. The former Indiana University baseball player now lives on the... Full Bio

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