MLB's new anti-hazing policy bans dressing players as women

An overlooked aspect of the new collective bargaining agreement was the formation of an anti-hazing and anti-bullying policy. For the most part, nobody knew what that policy entailed.

Now, thanks to an Associated Press report on Monday night, we have a better idea:

The policy, obtained by The Associated Press, prohibits "requiring, coercing or encouraging" players from "dressing up as women or wearing costumes that may be offensive to individuals based on their race, sex, nationality, age, sexual orientation, gender identify or other characteristic."

[...]

But requiring players "to consume alcoholic beverages or any other kind of drug, or requiring the ingestion of an undesirable or unwanted substance (food, drink, concoction)" is banned under the new collective bargaining agreement.

In other words, this is OK:

As is dressing up like a superhero:

This is not:

Seems reasonable enough.

Obviously, there are going to be those who bemoan the change -- citing how the whole world has gotten too sensitive or whatever. But what's the defense of using a woman's image or clothing to demean -- and if the intent is not to embarrass or belittle, then what is the intent? There are a million ways to rib young players if that's your sort of thing -- there's no justification for having to put down a gender to do it.

Thankfully, MLB and the union seem to have reached the same conclusion.

CBS Sports Staff

R.J. Anderson joined CBS Sports in 2016. He previously wrote for Baseball Prospectus, where he contributed to five of the New York Times bestselling annuals. His work has also appeared in Newsweek and... Full Bio

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