Pete Alonso breaks Mets rookie home run record less than halfway through the season

Mets rookie phenom Pete Alonso has already made franchise history. On Sunday, he took Chicago Cubs lefty Cole Hamels deep for his 27th home run of the season:

As noted in that tweet, Alonso now owns the franchise record for most home runs in a season by a rookie. It's June 23rd, people.

Darryl Strawberry hit 26 in 1983. No other rookie in Mets history has even hit 20 homers in a season. Alonso's on pace to get past 50, with 27 home runs in the team's first 78 games. Speaking of which, there's likely much more than this on the horizon for the young Mets' first baseman. 

Only 40 players have ever hit at least 30 home runs before the All-Star break. Alonso has 12 more games after Sunday in order to hit three homers and join that exclusive club. None of those players are rookies. 

Alonso's 26th homer, hit Saturday at Wrigley Field, was also a rookie record. The previous record for home runs before the All-Star break by a rookie was 25 (Cody Bellinger, 2017). 

Further, Alonso isn't even that far off the NL rookie record for home runs. Bellinger set it in 2017 with 39. Barring injury, it feels pretty likely he gets there, and then he can set eyes on the all-time rookie record, which is 52 (Aaron Judge, 2017). The only other rookie to top 40 was Mark McGwire with 49 in 1987. 

Dropping off the "rookie" caveat, Alonso has a shot at more Mets history as well. 

In terms of the most first-half homers, the most ever by a Mets player before the break is 30, hit by the one and only Dave Kingman (1976). Alonso sits in second place on that list. As for the Mets' single-season franchise record, well, it's one of the lowest and most attainable in the league. Carlos Beltran (2006) and Todd Hundley (1996) hit 41 in a season and are tied atop the franchise leaderboard. 

For now, Alonso has made Mets history. Moving forward, he seems poised to do a lot more in 2019. 

CBS Sports Writer

Matt Snyder has been a baseball writer with CBS Sports since 2011. A member of the BBWAA, he's now covered every World Series since 2010. The former Indiana University baseball player now lives on the... Full Bio

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