Kliff Kingsbury plans to give Cardinals players cell phone breaks during meetings

These days, everyone is trying to figure out how to appeal to millennials. From massive conglomerates to mom and pop stores to us here at CBSSports.com, figuring out a way to keep the attention of young consumers is a top priority for just about everyone. That includes NFL teams

While new Arizona Cardinals coach Kliff Kingsbury doesn't have to get his players to purchase anything, he does have to get them to buy into his system. And so, he's come up with an idea he thinks might help: cell phone breaks

Kingsbury was most recently a college coach, plying his trade at Texas Tech. He did the same thing there, and notes that the average age of an NFL player is only 25 years old, just a few years older than his college guys, and so he thinks the same principle should work in the league. 

"I think coming from the college ranks to obviously, those young men, it's got to be quick hitters, 20 minutes at a time, give them a break and get them back in," he said, per ESPN.com. "We want to make sure that when we have them, they're focused, and they're locked in, and we're maximizing their time. So if we've got to split it up or have shorter meetings, that's what we do."

Predictably, this drew the ire of traditionalists on football Twitter. If there's a choice between giving players a cell phone break and having them checking their cell phones rather than paying attention during meetings, the choice seems to be a good one. Of course, every team would rather their players not want to check their phones at all, but that's not super realistic in this day and age.

"You start to see kind of hands twitching and legs shaking, and you know they need to get that social media fix, so we'll let them hop over there and then get back in the meeting and refocus," Kingsbury said.

Everything Kingsbury does will presumably be judged based on whether the Cardinals become successful or not during his tenure as coach, so this gambit will likely not be judged on the merits of the decision itself, but how well Kingsbury can coach his players up after they're done checking their phones.

CBS Sports Writer

Jared Dubin is a New York lawyer and writer. He joined CBSSports.com in 2014 and has since spent far too much of his time watching film and working in spreadsheets. Full Bio

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