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The Zika virus is a concern for Jason Day and his growing family. USATSI

Rory McIlroy may no longer be concerned about the Zika virus but other top golfers are still worried about bringing back the virus if they compete in the 2016 Rio Olympics this summer, particularly those with budding families.

World No. 1 Jason Day, whose wife recently had their second child, said he's going to be monitoring the situation and has not made a final decision about playing due to concerns about bringing the virus back. The virus has been linked to causing birth defects and for Day, who still has plans of growing his family, he doesn't want a trip to the Olympics to have an impact on that.

"It's difficult to say right now," Day told the Associated Press. "We're just really trying to monitor what's going on because we're not done having kids. I don't want to have to bring anything back and have the possibility of that happening to us. Obviously, it can happen here. But if you put yourself down there, there's a chance of you getting it."

His concerns are legitimate, and Day is not done weighing his options and doing his due diligence on the matter.

"I don't think it's an Olympic issue. I don't think it's a Rio issue," Day continued. "I just think it's a medical issue attached to what happens if I go there, get it and bring it back. They don't know. The recommendation from the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) is 'X.' You don't know how long it's going to last in your body. So I'm a little wary about it.

"I've just got to make a smart, educated decision whether to go or not."

Charl Schwartzel, who pulled out of the Olympics in April, still plans to have more children and said that made the decision easy for him.

"If I didn't want to have children, or if I was single, I'd play," Schwartzel told the Associated Press. "It's as simple as that."

Schwartzel added that if it were "anywhere else" he would play and that he would love to play in the Olympics.

With golf making its first appearance in the Olympics and a vote coming in 2017 to determine whether it stays beyond 2020, the 2016 event in Rio is off to a poor start. Some of the world's best players, like Adam Scott, having little interest in adding it to their schedule, and others concerned over their health and well being.