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The U.S. House of Representatives' Oversight Committee heard from six former employees of the Washington Commanders on Thursday, when several members of Congress argued team owner Daniel Snyder has not fully been held accountable for his role in a workplace culture once rampant with sexual harassment. Now, the committee has issued another letter to NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, calling on the league to release the full findings of its investigation into Washington, while threatening "alternate means of obtaining compliance" from both the team and NFL.

To date, the NFL has shared nearly 80,000 pages of documents related to its investigation of the Commanders' allegedly inappropriate work environment, league spokesperson Brian McCarthy said Friday, per NFL.com. But McCarthy added that the Oversight Committee, the top investigative arm of the U.S. House, is now asking for many documents "clearly protected by the attorney-client privilege." The committee revealed Friday that, days after the NFL officially took over Snyder's investigation into his own team, the NFL and Commanders (then the Washington Football Team) agreed to a "joint legal strategy" that prohibited any investigation information from being shared without the consent of both parties.

The NFL withdrew from its private agreement with the team in October, per the committee, the same month the chairman and chairwoman of the Oversight Committee first contacted Goodell about turning over investigation information. This has created a "legal limbo," per NFL.com, with the league withholding the full release of documents requested by Congress.

The committee also revealed Friday that, while Snyder and the Commanders agreed that attorney Beth Wilkinson, who conducted the NFL's investigation into the team, would produce a written report with her findings; Goodell asked Wilkinson to present her findings to him orally instead. Goodell believed an oral briefing "would better preserve the anonymity assurances given to many of the witnesses" involved in the investigation, according to an NFL memo submitted to the committee in November.

The attorneys of dozens of former Washington employees have called for the exact opposite, however, demanding for months now the full release of investigation findings. That includes the six former staffers who appeared before the committee at a Washington, D.C., hearing on Thursday, as CBS Sports reported. In addition to levying new allegations of sexual harassment against Snyder himself (which the owner has since denied), the ex-employees all sought more transparency from the findings, arguing that Snyder has escaped full culpability for the harassment that occurred within his organization over an 18-year period.