In a battle of the two longest winning streaks in the NBA, the Boston Celtics will put their 13-game streak on the line Thursday night as they welcome the Golden State Warriors, themselves on a seven-game streak, to Boston.

Ahead of the game, the Warriors' Draymond Green made his way over to Harvard on Thursday afternoon to speak at the school's Institute of Politics. At one point, the wide-ranging discussion turned towards the mini controversy between Green and Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban.

Earlier this month, Cuban told ESPN that he believes Green owes the NBA an apology for his post on Instagram suggesting that perhaps it is time to stop using the word owner in sports. Green's post was in response to Houston Texans owner Bob McNair reportedly saying, of the NFL players protesting, "we can't have the inmates running the prison."

Thoughtful as always, Green responded to Cuban's statements, saying that he wasn't taking a shot at any specific owners, but made his comment in a hope that it could spark change. Green also made clear that he disagreed with Cuban's statement that he was wrong for saying what he said. "You can't say I'm dead wrong, because you really don't know how it feels to turn on that TV and see a young black man shot by a police officer when he was unarmed. You will never get that feeling. So it's hard to say I'm wrong when you don't have that," Green said. 

Green's full comments:

"To turn on the TV and see what happened in Charlottesville, he'll never have that feeling. So when I say, 'hey, maybe we shouldn't use that word,' to be honest, I don't really expect him to understand where I'm coming from. Because he will never feel what I feel when I turn on the TV and see however many people taken down by the KKK or whatever group it was. Like, he'll never know that feeling that I have about that.

"You can try to understand it, and he still will never understand it quite to the degree I do. Just, for instance, if there's someone who's Jewish, they may feel a certain way about ... Germans. I will never know that feeling. Because it's not me. Now I can sympathize with them, and I can say 'man, I feel bad for them.' But I'll never know deeply how that feels.

"So I think that's the most important thing, is just understanding that it's not to take a shot at the owner of these entities. It's more so trying to help spark change. To help others who may be similar to me. [Pointing to someone in the crowd:] He may feel the same way I feel, because he's African-American. But as much as Bob [Myers] may sympathize with me. And Bob will even say it himself, 'I can't really say how you feel with that.'

"So it's kind of hard to speak out and say, 'that's wrong, and you can't feel that way. I can own equity, I can do this. And you're dead wrong for saying that.' But you can't say I'm dead wrong, because you really don't know how it feels to turn on that TV and see a young black man shot by a police officer when he was unarmed. You will never get that feeling. So it's hard to say I'm wrong when you don't have that."

As Green showed yet again on Thursday afternoon, he is one of the smartest, and most thoughtful players in the league. While opponents might get sick of hearing him talk trash on the floor, when Green is speaking off the floor, it's time for everyone to listen.