jesus-sanchez.jpg

At this point, it's not a question of whether Connor Joe or Steven Kwan should be added in all Fantasy Baseball leagues. Kwan (64%) reached base three more times Monday, giving him a league-high nine hits, six runs and five walks in his first four career games; Joe (43%) homered Monday and now has two homers, three RBI, and four runs while starting all four games for the Rockies, including the past two as a leadoff hitter. Sure, maybe you might not be able to find room for Joe in a 10-team H2H points league, or something, but in all likelihood, you've got room for both of these guys on your roster.

The question, then, is who you should drop for them? Joe and Kwan have been the two players we've been asked about most often in the early going, but it doesn't help to just say to add them, because if your worst outfielder is someone like Jorge Soler, it might be pretty tough to actually find room for them on your roster. 

One such question I got Tuesday was asking if someone should drop Eddie Rosario for Joe in a 10-team league, and I was surprised at how agreeable I found the idea. I had Joe as a top-75 outfielder coming into the season, so it's not like I was completely out on him, but I had Rosario inside of my top-50, so that's a pretty big jump for early in the season, right?

I'm not sure it is, at least not in a 10-team league. Rosario is a fine player, but I don't think he's exactly irreplaceable; he hit .259 with 14 homers and 11 steals in 2021. And, while that was worse production than his previous two seasons, I'm not expecting a return to his 2019 production from the now-30-year-old, either. Joe won't provide as much speed, but with Coors Field helping to inflate his numbers, I don't think it's unreasonable to think he could hit 30 points higher than Rosario with 25-plus homers. And his chances of hitting that ceiling look a lot better now that he seems locked into a pretty valuable everyday role for the Rockies. 

It may be harder to justify that kind of move in a 12-team league or deeper, where the replacement level on the waiver wire isn't as high, but in a 10-team league, you shouldn't have much trouble finding a usable replacement if Kwan or Joe turn back into pumpkins. I view Kwan and Joe pretty similar in terms of rest-of-season value, so for the time being at least, I'm going to pair them for this exercise; if I'd drop someone for Joe, I'd drop them for Kwan, and vice versa. 

And, as I said Monday, there's an opportunity cost involved in not being aggressive in adding Kwan or Joe at this point in the season, because this is likely your only chance to acquire them if this is the start of them being difference makers. They may not be, but it probably makes sense to err on the side of being more aggressive – at least until you are dropping players with more upside for them. 

So, with that in mind, I've moved both Kwan and Joe into my top 50 in the outfield rankings for Roto leagues, which is, admittedly, pretty aggressive. But this is the time to be aggressive. Here's who comes in just ahead and behind them in my rankings: 

41. Chris Taylor
42. Adolis Garcia
43. Alex Verdugo
44. Trent Grisham
45. Robbie Grossman
46. Austin Meadows
47. Daulton Varsho
48. Jo Adell
49. Steven Kwan
50. Connor Joe
51. Alex Kiriloff
52. Avisail Garcia
53. Eddie Rosario
54. Ryan Mountcastle
55. Alex Kiriloff
56. Michael Conforto
57. Adam Duvall
58. Dylan Carlson 

So, that should give you an idea of the range of players I'm willing to drop for Kwan or Joe, and who I'd try to hang on to if I can. Here are some other players to consider adding on waivers based on Monday's action around the league:

Possible waiver wire pickups
SD San Diego • #22 • Age: 31
Rest of Season Projections
H2H PTS
106
ROTO RNK
684th
ROSTERED
16%
@SFG
IP
5.0
H
5
BB
1
ER
1
K
6
Martinez put up an ugly 4.77 ERA and 1.45 WHIP over parts of four seasons with the Rangers from 2014 through 2017, but the Padres liked what they saw from him in his time in Japan enough to give him $9m guaranteed with three player option years as a free agent this offseason. Martinez had a 3.02 ERA and 1.24 WHIP in three seasons in Japan, and he was very impressive in quieting a good Giants lineup in his first start Monday. He limited them to just one run over five innings of work, with six strikeouts and one walk, and while he didn't bring much velocity to the table – 92.5 mph with his fastball – Martinez mixed his pitches well and got nine swinging strikes between his cutter and changeup – and even had three more on that fastball. I'm not sure Martinez is going to be a difference maker, but he was impressive enough in his first start to warrant a closer look.
NYY N.Y. Yankees • #50 • Age: 30
Rest of Season Projections
H2H PTS
291.5
ROTO RNK
389th
ROSTERED
59%
vs. TOR
INN
5
H
5
ER
2
BB
0
K
6
Facing a tough Blue Jays lineup, Taillon gave up some loud contact Monday, but was pretty impressive overall. He racked up 17 swinging strikes in the game, and while he had a few games with more last season, his 23.6% rate Monday was higher than any start a year ago. He had nine of those whiffs with his fastball and three with both his slider and changeup, a good sign after he sported middling whiff rates on pretty much all of his secondary pitches a year ago. It's just one start, and Taillon's velocity still hasn't rebounded to his pre-injury levels, but it was a promising start in a tough matchup.
MIA Miami • #7 • Age: 24
Rest of Season Projections
H2H PTS
421
ROTO RNK
70th
ROSTERED
66%
2022 Stats
AVG
.313
HR
2
OPS
1.040
AB
16
BB
1
K
4
Sanchez showed what he can do when he gets into one Monday – or, in this specific case, what happens when he gets into a couple. He had three batted balls hit over 105 mph in Monday's game, including a 108.5 mph homer that traveled 391 feet and was overshadowed by a 439-foot bomb he hit 110 mph earlier in the game. Sanchez has started all four games for the Marlins so far, batting second or third in three of them – the lone exception coming when he hit seventh against tough lefty Carlos Rodon, which was also the only game so far where he has multiple strikeouts. He hit .251/.319/.489 with a 30-plus-homer pace in 64 games last season, and while he still needs to elevate the ball more, Monday's game was a nice reminder of what happens when he does, and why there's so much upside here.
TB Tampa Bay • #52 • Age: 24
Rest of Season Projections
H2H PTS
135.5
ROTO RNK
630th
ROSTERED
9%
2021 Stats (AA, AAA)
IP
110.1
ERA
2.61
WHIP
0.961
K/9
11.8
BB/9
2.5
Romero will make his major-league debut Tuesday against the Athletics, which is about as soft a landing spot as you can hope for. He's not viewed as one of the Rays top-10 prospects, mostly because the stuff doesn't stand out in the way we're used to seeing from this organization. However, the 24-year-old struck out 33% of hitters he saw between Double-A and Triple-A last season, with a 2.61 ERA and 0.961 WHIP in 110.1 innings. He's been tough to square up in addition to generating a healthy amount of swings and misses in the minors, and scouting reports bring to mind a poor man's Freddy Peralta, another pitcher who leans heavily on a fastball that doesn't necessarily pop on the radar gun but seems to generate a ton of uncomfortable plate appearances for hitters. That's not to say Romero will be as good as Peralta, obviously, but the minor-league numbers make him worth a look at least.