Mets activate David Wright and explain why he's 'unlikely' to see action until the weekend

The New York Mets delivered on their promise to activate long-time third baseman David Wright from the disabled list Tuesday, prior to the last homestand of the year. Wright is scheduled to get one more start at the hot corner before he walks away, with that scheduled for Saturday.

But Wright probably won't see duty before Friday at the earliest -- not even as a pinch-hitter. According to Mets co-GM John Ricco, they'll likely abstain from using Wright against the Atlanta Braves because the Braves are competing for home-field advantage in the playoffs.

Or, in other words, the Mets don't want to use a player who they feel threatens the integrity of the game (the postseason bracket):

Besides serving as a certain punchline for if and when the Mets do something poorly or disagreeable during the Braves series, it doesn't inspire much confidence in Wright having a throwback moment come the weekend. Granted, it's an understandable reality. Wright hasn't played in the majors since 2016 and has just 15 uninspiring minor-league games under his belt the past two years. Injuries have ravaged and sapped his physical ability. It's not his fault, it's just life.

To Ricco's point, the Braves are indeed jockeying for position within the National League bracket. They're three losses behind the Chicago Cubs for home-field advantage throughout the divisional and championship rounds, and one loss ahead of the Los Angeles Dodgers for hosting privileges in the divisional series. These games matter, albeit for only one side.

Once the Braves depart, the Mets will host the Miami Marlins. Those games don't matter, really -- except for Wright and Mets fans wanting to send him off properly. You can argue which one the Mets should consider more important, but they've seemingly made their decision. 

CBS Sports Staff

R.J. Anderson joined CBS Sports in 2016. He previously wrote for Baseball Prospectus, where he contributed to five of the New York Times bestselling annuals. His work has also appeared in Newsweek and... Full Bio

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