Cole Beasley says the Cowboys' critics are 'all full of poop' and they 'don't understand'

Watching the NFL in Week 1, one of the most disappointing teams was the Dallas Cowboys

Sure, the Cowboys were missing star center Travis Frederick and their pass-catching corps had been the subject of criticism throughout the offseason, but nobody expected the Dallas offense to look quite as impotent as it did for most of Sunday's matchup with the Carolina Panthers. Dallas averaged a dreadful 4.1 yards per play, 29th in the NFL. Dak Prescott was under pressure all afternoon, and when he wasn't, his receivers weren't open, and when they were, he couldn't find them. 

Unsurprisingly, the Cowboys have been one of the most-criticized teams during the early part of the lead-up to Week 2, when they'll take on the division rival New York Giants on "Sunday Night Football." One of the only members of the offense who played well in Week 1, wide receiver Cole Beasley (seven catches for 73 yards), responded to that criticism on Tuesday. 

"There are a lot of things people see and don't understand," Beasley said, per the Forth Worth Star-Telegram. "There is a lot of opinions out there about what we shouldn't or shouldn't do or how bad the group is. We can't read and can't care about it. ... One of the biggest reason you can't listen to any of it ... it's all full of poop. We have to focus on what we do and get better."

There are a lot of areas where the Cowboys can improve after that Week 1 debacle. They can block better for Ezekiel Elliott. Elliott himself can do a better job finding the role hole through which to run. They can do a better job of protecting Prescott. Prescott himself can do a better job of finding the open receiver and making an accurate throw. The receivers can do a better job of getting open. In other words, they can do pretty much everything better, because it can't get much worse than it was against Carolina. 

Nevertheless, Beasley maintains that the Cowboys are still confident in their offense. 

"There is no loss in confidence in all," Beasley said. "Watching the tape there were plays out there to be made. It was maybe one guy on any given play didn't do their job that was breaking everything down making it look worse than it was. We still had plenty of opportunities to move the rock. We will clean those things up and get better."

CBS Sports Writer

Jared Dubin is a New York lawyer and writer. He joined CBSSports.com in 2014 and has since spent far too much of his time watching film and working in spreadsheets. Full Bio

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