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The Los Angeles Lakers and Boston Celtics are bitter rivals, and as such, they don't trade with one another very often. It hasn't happened since 2004, and in franchise history, it has happened only three times. But with the 2022 trade deadline just two days away, the Lakers and Celtics are linked in the rumor mill for the first time in years.

Marc Stein, Jake Fischer of Bleacher Report and Brian Robb of MassLive all reported on Tuesday that the Lakers are interested in Celtics guard Josh Richardson. On paper, Richardson makes plenty of sense as a Lakers target. Though he's had an uneven few years, Richardson is shooting 40 percent from behind the arc this season. His defense has, at times, been quite strong, and though he hasn't quite sustained the shot-creation he displayed in Miami, he's still more than capable of attacking closeouts. 

The question for the Lakers is whether or not they're willing to meet Boston's asking price. The Celtics would seemingly want the Lakers to include their 2027 first-round pick in the deal. Given the relative age of this roster, that pick could potentially be quite valuable. The Lakers could fire back and suggest that a swap of Talen Horton-Tucker and second-round picks for Richardson would have very positive financial ramifications for Boston. The Celtics are roughly $2.8 million above the luxury tax line, and a deal like this would save them around $2.1 million. But Boston would likely draw a line in the sand over that 2027 pick. 

Most teams discussing trades with the Lakers will take that stance. Horton-Tucker's trade value has diminished considerably this season as he has struggled to play a supporting role. Boston might be interested in him as a long-term project, but giving him Richardson's spot in the rotation would hurt them for the rest of this season at least. The 30-25 Celtics are already seeded No. 8 in the Eastern Conference. 

The Lakers have between now and Thursday to decide how to allocate that 2027 draft pick on the trade market, or if they're even willing to move it at all. It seems as though doing so is their only real chance at adding a difference-maker.