O.J. Simpson was an "incorrigible womanizer" who "felt entitled to whatever he wanted" according to interviews in Part 2 of O.J.: Made in America.

The second episode of the sprawling 5-part ESPN documentary aired Tuesday night and delved into Simpson's life after football, his troubled second marriage to Nicole Brown Simpson and his preferential treatment by the LAPD.

Former friends recounted O.J.'s rampant infidelity while married to Nicole, whose own relationship had started as an affair after O.J. -- married at the time -- spotted an 18-year-old Nicole waiting tables at a private Los Angeles club.

"He was an incorrigible womanizer," said Thomas McCollum III, an author who palled around with Simpson in the '80s and '90s.

Robin Greer, another friend from O.J.'s Brentwood days, said the football star made repeated advances toward her and that O.J. and Nicole constantly fought over his affairs with other women.

"I think O.J. felt entitled to whatever O.J. wanted," Greer said.

One of those alleged other women? Tawny Kitaen -- who for anybody who grew up in the MTV 1980s remembers as the bombshell who famously danced atop David Coverdale's two Jaguars in the video for Whitesnake's Here I Go Again.


According to Greer, O.J. started his affair with Kitaen because Nicole got "fat" while she was pregnant and he didn't want to sleep with his wife.

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O.J. Simpson allegedly had an affair with Tawny Kitaen. Getty Images

As for Kitaen, she starred in a number of forgettable 1980s movies and wound up marrying and divorcing both Coverdale -- whose inspiration for his band's name remains the most '80s thing ever -- and former big league pitcher Chuck Finley. But she's still best known for her turn doing the splits and cartwheels atop those Jaguars.

O.J., of course, remains infamous for other reasons. His childhood friend Joe Bell offered up this prescient quote while recounting O.J.'s affairs.


Part 3 of O.J. Made in America airs Wednesday at 9 ET on ESPN. For how to watch and stream all five parts of the 30 for 30 documentary, click here.