Former Braves GM Coppolella joins short list of living people banned from baseball

MLB commissioner Rob Manfred dropped the hammer Monday on the Braves for improprieties concerning international signings. Former Braves general manager John Coppolella was also punished and it was in a big way. Manfred placed "Coppy" on the permanently ineligible list, which many have come to describe as being "banned from baseball." 

This isn't unprecedented, as there's a grouping of players and personnel through the years to have been banned from baseball. Among those who have since died, only Shoeless Joe Jackson's ban remains relevant, as it's at least one reason he's not getting into the Hall the Fame for the time being. 

Among those still alive, the ban still applies in additional ways, obviously. Here are the four men currently on the permanently ineligible list. 

Coppolella: After the Braves were severely punished, it was unlikely Coppolella was ever going to get a job in baseball again. Manfred has just taken it completely off the table. Even if Coppolella eventually found a way to get back into the good graces with someone, he's probably not worth fighting to hire now. 

Chris Correa: The former Cardinals scouting director hacked into the Astros' scouting database. MLB found him guilty of the matter and put him on the permanently ineligible list last January. He was also sentenced to 46 months in prison, as unauthorized access to a protected computer is a federal crime. I wouldn't expect to ever see Correa challenge the ban here. 

Jenrry Mejia: The former Mets reliever is the only player to ever violated the Joint Drug Agreement three times. It's pretty set in stone. Mejia failed three drug tests for performance-enhancing drugs, a violation that explicitly carries a sentence of the permanently ineligible list. 

Pete Rose: Of course, here's the big name. As with Mejia, Rose wasn't slapped with this sentence at the discretion of a commissioner like Coppolella and Correa were. Rose knowingly bet on baseball -- and did so repeatedly for years -- an action that has long explicitly carried the sentence of being placed on the permanently ineligible list. Rose has been trying to get the ban removed for years and keeps getting in his own way. It's hard to see this thing being overturned while he's still alive. Perhaps he'll be enshrined into the Hall of Fame as a player someday, but it's not happening any time soon. 

CBS Sports Writer

Matt Snyder has been a baseball writer with CBS Sports since 2011. A member of the BBWAA, he's now covered every World Series since 2010. The former Indiana University baseball player now lives on the... Full Bio

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