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Circumstances have changed since our first round of draft prep. We're working with a much shorter schedule now, which of course changes the way certain players are valued. It was always the year of the pitcher, with the most skilled at that position enjoying a bump in value at a time when offense dominates the game. But now, even those with workload limitations are able to join in.

Consider this your reintroduction to the 2020 draft pool, accounting for all the changes that have taken place since and because of the coronavirus lockdown. Over the span of 20 articles, Scott White and Chris Towers look at the top 200 in Scott's Rotisserie rankings, highlighting the reasons for and against drafting each. It makes for a well-rounded education on every player, revealing critical details that more argument-based evaluations might conveniently leave out. 

So if you want a crash course on this year's player pool, particularly in light of more recent events, you've come to the right place. We're going through Nos. 191-200 here, solidly in the bargain bin portion of your draft. And you can find the rest right here: 1-10 | 11-20 | 21-30 | 31-40 | 41-50 | 51-60 | 61-70 | 71-80 | 81-90 | 91-100 | 101-110 | 111-120 | 121-130 | 131-140 | 141-150 | 151-160 | 161-170 | 171-180 | 181-190 | 191-200

The Case For/The Case Against
No. 191-200
No. 191
NYY N.Y. Yankees • #59 • Age: 29
2019 Stats
AVG
0.263
HR
21
R
72
RBI
62
SB
0
SO
142

The Case For: Voit's first season as the Yankees regular first baseman went swimmingly for the three months he was healthy. He took his walks, maintained the high-BABIP profile that made him such an interesting find late in 2018 and of course put plenty of balls in the bleachers, both at home and away. In all, he had a .280 batting average, .393 on-base percentage, 17 homers and .901 OPS when he first went on the IL with a strained abdominal in late June. It was ultimately revealed to be a sports hernia, which ultimately required surgery, so everything he did after that was under false pretenses. He was either playing through pain or rushing to make it back from the procedure for the playoff push.       

The Case Against: Maybe his poor finish was as simple as that. Maybe there was more to it. But no matter what theory you subscribe to, there's all the more reason to doubt Voit at a time when the Yankees have no shortage of first base alternatives. Miguel Andujar, who was always miscast as a third baseman, is working his way back from a torn labrum in his shoulder and looking for a place to play. Mike Ford is a year younger than Voit and offers an even more impressive batted-ball profile. Voit may still get the first crack, but he no longer has a stranglehold on the position. -Scott White

No. 192
MIN Minnesota • #12 • Age: 30
2019 Stats
INN
159.0
W
15
K's
178
ERA
3.51
WHIP
1.21

The Case For: Odorizzi's spike in velocity last year led to career-best numbers for the most part, with his K/9 rate making the biggest leap from 8.2 over the previous four years to 10.1. His swinging-strike rate, also a career high, would have ranked in the top 20 if he had the innings to qualify, and it remained consistent even as he scuffled in the second half. With the Twins offense backing him, he managed to win 15 games even though he went six-plus innings in only 10 of his 30 starts.

The Case Against: You caught it already, right? The quick hook? He failed to reach 160 innings even though he made 30 starts. No matter how good the supporting cast, he won't win games at that same pace again if he's not controlling his own destiny. He figures to take a step back otherwise, too, because even though he remained as vulnerable to fly balls as ever, he kept the ball in the park at an unreal rate given that it was a historic year for home runs. In fact, his home run-to-fly ball rate would have been the lowest among all qualifiers. All that's even before you even consider that he may not sustain the velocity gains that led to the uptick in strikeouts. -Scott White

No. 193
TEX Texas • #1 • Age: 31
2019 Stats
AVG
0.275
HR
12
R
81
RBI
72
SB
31
SO
96

The Case For: Though it's starting to look like that 2017 season when he hit 20 homers was the outlier, it was nice to see Andrus bounce back in a big way in stolen bases after an injury-marred 2018. He didn't do much else, but it was still enough to be a top-12 shortstop and top-75 player overall. The overall package may not blow you away, but he consistently finishes as a top-12 shortstop and never gets drafted like one.

The Case Against: Andrus will be 31 in 2020, and it's fair to wonder when he might stop running. He's never been a particularly efficient base stealer, and if that falls off, the overall profile probably isn't enough to make up for it. There are shortstops being drafted after him with more upside, too, so it's a tough profile to bet on. -Chris Towers

No. 194
TOR Toronto • #24 • Age: 23
2019 Minors
INN
101.2
W
5
K's
119
ERA
2.30
WHIP
0.89

The Case For: Pearson was the talk of the initial spring training in 2020, prior to the shutdown, demonstrating an ability to overwhelm major-league hitters with his 100-mph heat. He dominated across three levels in what his first extended look in the minors last year, placing him in the top 10 in most preseason prospect rankings. The biggest knock on him was durability, and the Blue Jays were careful in limiting him to only 101 2/3 innings last year. The shortened schedule means he won't have any season-long restrictions, though, potentially putting him in the starting five to begin the year.

The Case Against: Just because he won't have a season-long innings limit doesn't mean the Blue Jays will turn Pearson loose. Working his way back from a fractured forearm last year, they had him throw just two innings every other start for the first 2 1/2 months. It won't be that extreme, but don't expect him to go six with regularity. Like any pitcher just breaking in, he still has to prove he can stay in the strike zone and sequence hitters properly. And seeing as the Blue Jays aren't obvious contenders, it's still possible they don't call him up, regardless of how short the season is. -Scott White

No. 195
HOU Houston • #39 • Age: 27
2019 Stats
INN
61.1
W
5
K's
100
ERA
4.70
WHIP
1.32

The Case For: James emerged as the favorite for the fifth starter job in the initial spring training, having altered his mechanics to become more "linear" to the plate. It should help with the control issues that plagued his rookie season — one spent mostly in long relief — and if he clears that hurdle, everything else should fall into place. His 14.7 K/9 was like that of an elite closer, and his final minor-league season, spent mostly as a starter, points to a high ceiling as well. He had a 3.23 ERA, 1.12 WHIP and 13.5 K/9 in 2018. Say what you want about the Astros, but they have a knack for maximizing talent.

The Case Against: What the mechanical change does in theory and what it does in reality are of course two different things, and James did have 5.1 BB/9 last year. He won't make it as a starter doing that, and he may not make it anyway, given the Astros' surplus of alternatives. If he's inefficient as a starter and begins taxing the bullpen, they may decide he's better off there and try their hand with someone like Framber Valdez or Forrest Whitley instead. As a fly-ball pitcher, James is vulnerable to the long ball at a time when they're all too common.  -Scott White

No. 196
CIN Cincinnati • #26 • Age: 30
2019 Stats
INN
67.0
S
34
K's
89
ERA
4.16
WHIP
1.22

The Case For: The Reds are shaping up to be one of the most improved teams in the majors, having put together a deep rotation and lineup with some big transactions over the past couple years. It should mean more save chances for Iglesias, who has served as their closer for three straight years. And while he wasn't at his best in this past one, he struck out batters at a higher rate than ever. He was also coming off a three-year stretch with a 2.47 ERA.

The Case Against: Iglesias has become dangerously vulnerable to the long ball the past two years, giving up two more home runs than any other full-time closer during that span. It manifested last year with a 4.16 ERA, but his FIP in 2018 was an even higher 4.23. Perhaps he was lucky to have the ERA he did two years ago rather than unlucky to have the one he did last year.. He came dangerously close to losing his job last year and has ceded seven saves to his backup each of the past two years, which means the Reds don't always handle him like a typical closer to begin with. -Scott White

No. 197
WAS Washington • #63 • Age: 33
2019 Stats
INN
60.0
S
29
K's
66
ERA
4.05
WHIP
1.30

The Case For: Doolittle was one of the most dominant relievers inning for inning in 2018, putting together a 1.60 ERA, 0.60 WHIP and 12.0 K/9, and has consistently delivered some of the most impressive strikeout-to-walk ratios of any reliever. He performed capably through the first two-thirds of last season before a knee injury popped up in August, eventually landing him on the IL — but only before wrecking his ERA. He's expected to be the full-time closer again after having to share the role for the Nationals' playoff run.        

The Case Against: The last time Doolittle was healthy from the start of a season to the finish was 2013, and while his injuries have rarely impacted his production like they did last year, it's possible some skills erosion may be at play, too. Even from the start last year, he wasn't throwing as hard, and his numbers at the time the knee flared up — a 2.81 ERA, 1.21 WHIP and 10.7 K/9 — weren't up to his usual standard. Now that the Nationals have gotten comfortable with him splitting saves with Daniel Hudson, how quickly might they go back to that arrangement? -Scott White

No. 198
ARI Arizona • #25 • Age: 28
2019 Stats
INN
71.2
S
18
K's
87
ERA
3.52
WHIP
1.44

The Case For: There's no getting out of it this time, you sneaky snakes. The Diamondbacks seemed poised to install Bradley as their closer each of the past two seasons only to pivot to someone else in spring training, leaving Fantasy Baseballers high and dry. But they did finally turn to the right-hander midway through 2019, and he responded with 18 saves in 19 chances, putting together a 2.10 ERA during that stretch. And this time around, there's literally no one else in their bullpen who's equipped for the role.

The Case Against: Haaave you met Kevin Ginkel? Dude had a 1.66 ERA, 0.96 WHIP and 13.7 K/9 between the majors and minors last year. Chances are you haven't heard of him, though, and if you have, chances are you hadn't heard of him at this time a year ago. Which shows how suddenly and unexpectedly new closer alternatives can emerge. Maybe it won't be him who unseats Bradley, but if Bradley pitches more like his full-season numbers — which have been less than closer-caliber in back-to-back years — the Diamondbacks will likely find someone to replace him. Doesn't seem like they wanted him there in the first place. -Scott White

No. 199
MIN Minnesota • #44 • Age: 40
2019 Stats
INN
58.2
W
4
K's
72
ERA
2.45
WHIP
1.13

The Case For: Inning for inning, Hill has been as bankable as any starting pitcher since finding his footing with the Red Sox late in the 2015 season, and over the past three years with the Dodgers, he put together a 3.30 ERA, 1.11 WHIP and 10.7 K/9. The delayed start to the season has given him ample time to overcome his offseason elbow procedure, and the shortened schedule improves his chances of sticking around for the long haul. Despite his lengthy injury history, he tends to pitch deep into games when healthy, which could translate to a high number of victories with the Twins lineup backing him.

The Case Against: Notice all the mentions of his health? Hill hasn't thrown even 140 innings in a season since 2007. And while the shortened schedule of course puts that number out of reach for everyone, the point is that Hill is likely to miss time at some point. Any time he misses this year would make up a more signficant percentage of the season. Plus, he's a 40-year-old coming back from what's being described as a Tommy John half-measure. How confident are we he'll even be himself? . -Scott White

No. 200
OAK Oakland • #12 • Age: 25
2019 Stats
AVG
0.245
HR
4
R
14
RBI
8
SB
0
SO
16

The Case For: The A's showed a lot of faith in Murphy late last season, as he started 13 of the team's final 19 games during the middle of a playoff chase. That alone represents a strong vote of confidence, without even getting into the fact that he hit .266 with 22 homers, 95 RBI and 103 runs in 155 games between Double-A and Triple-A in his career. Murphy figures to get plenty of playing time and has the potential to be a top-five catcher if he stays healthy.      

The Case Against: That "if he stays healthy" bit applies to every catcher, but especially to Murphy, who has never played more than 98 games in a season. There's plenty of potential in the bat, but he's unproven and has been injury prone in the past, which makes him tough to rely on. -Chris Towers

So which sleepers should you snatch in your draft? And which undervalued first baseman can help you win a championship? Visit SportsLine now to get rankings for every single position, all from the model that called Kenta Maeda's huge breakout last season, and find out.