As recently as April 23 of this year, Pete Rose denied that he ever bet on baseball as a player. However, a report by ESPN's Outside The Lines offers evidence that Rose, who for years denied betting on baseball as a manager before finally admitting as much, did indeed bet on games in which he played. As for that evidence, OTL has obtained documents that reportedly show Rose's betting on games during his playing days with the Reds, specifically in 1986, when he served as player-manager. 

According to the report, new documents show that Rose bet "extensively" on baseball, and on the Cincinnati Reds. Rose had been pressing new MLB commissioner Rob Manfred to lift his ban and reinstate him.

"This does it. This closes the door," said John Dowd, the man who's 1989 report led to Rose being banned from baseball.

Pete Rose
A new report claims Pete Rose bet on baseball as a player. (USATSI)

Ray Genco, Rose's attorney, released the following statement from Rose to CBSSports.com:

Since we submitted the application earlier this year, we committed to MLB that we would not comment on specific matters relating to reinstatement. I need to maintain that. To be sure, I'm eager to sit down with Mr. Manfred to address my entire history - the good and the bad -and my long personal journey since baseball. That meeting likely will come sometime after the All-Star break.

Rose, 74, has been on baseball's permanently ineligible list since he agreed to those sanctions in 1989. It was after Rose was banned that the Hall of Fame ruled that players on the permanently ineligible list could not be voted in.

All of this stems from Rose's violation of Rule 21-D, the text of which hangs in every major-league clubhouse and has for decades:

"Any player, umpire, or club official or employee, who shall bet any sum whatsoever upon any baseball game in connection with which the bettor has no duty to perform shall be declared ineligible for one year. Any player, umpire, or club or league official or employee, who shall bet any sum whatsoever upon any baseball game in connection with which the bettor has a duty to perform shall be declared permanently ineligible."

Rose is of course baseball's all-time hits leader. He retired from playing following the 1986 campaign with 4,256 hits across parts of 24 big-league seasons. 

Here's the OTL document in question:

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More to come on this story.