I have a confession to make: I just don't care much about positions anymore. With the exception of catcher, I'm just not going to be worrying too much about positional scarcity when drafting for 2018. 

There's just too much production out there, spread too evenly across the positional spectrum.

Now, that's not to say scarcity doesn't exist or doesn't matter. On the whole, first basemen will be a little better than third basemen and outfielders, who will be a little better than shortstops and second basemen, and your personal rankings should reflect that. However, I'm no longer going to give someone a huge, multi-round jump in value on Draft Day just because they happen to have a "2B" or "SS" next to their name. Here are results for Rotisserie leagues in 2017, showing where players finished at each position, relative to where they finished overall based solely on production:

POS RANK C 1B 2B 3B SS
POS RANK OF
1 56 4 5 7 18 1 1
2 116 10 12 12 25 4 11
3 122 22 15 34 55 7 19
4 123 23 17 37 62 10 28
5 131 24 31 41 65 13 35
6 153 26 32 47 68 16 45
7 197 29 38 49 77 19 57
8 240 33 50 61 82 22 60
9 249 46 57 62 90 25 68
10 265 51 68 73 91 28 72
11 270 64 80 74 96 31 76
12 317 66 90 79 98 36 95
24 365 122 168 155 236 60 183

Here are those results in visual form: 

When it comes to starters, first basemen are well ahead of the pack, with all of the top-12 finished inside of the overall top-70. Third basemen are a little bit worse, second basemen are a little worse still, and shortstop and outfield bring up the rear when it comes to the quality of the worst starter.

But the gap just isn't that big these days. Especially once you account for the presence of guys like Jose Ramirez, Manny Machado, and Alex Bregman at third, who will likely start at a different position. Shortstop doesn't have the depth of the other infield positions, especially when it comes to homers, runs and RBI. However, there are plenty of solid options in the middle rounds who are worth starting, along with that burgeoning class of elite, superstar caliber shortstops.

You see similar results in SportsLine's projections for the 2018 season: 

POS RANK C 1B 2B 3B SS
POS RANK OF
1 50 4 2 7 3 1 1
2 80 10 9 9 24 4 8
3 82 15 13 22 29 7 16
4 131 17 34 25 38 10 20
5 161 18 45 26 42 13 35
6 217 28 47 27 51 16 41
7 228 30 48 31 75 19 53
8 231 39 58 51 89 22 57
9 271 44 73 52 95 25 60
10 286 49 74 56 99 28 63
11 287 55 79 58 106 31 78
12 291 68 83 66 109 36 96
24 409 121 166 164 208 60 154

Here are those results in visual form: 

The one exception is obvious: Catcher. Buster Posey and Willson Contreras slot into the top 100, but there's a clear gap between them and the No. 1 option, Gary Sanchez. Last season, Sanchez was 60 spots ahead of either, and our projections have him 30 spots clear of either. And that might be underselling the difference: BaseballProspectus.com's PECOTA projection system has Sanchez as the No. 26 hitter in 2018, with Contreras and Posey coming in at 83 and 109.

And, of course, it's not only at the top where catcher falls well short. The No. 12 catcher is projected to finish 291st with no positional adjustment, and the No. 24 catcher is at 409; last season, they finished 317th and 365th. That means even in a one-catcher league, you're going to be starting someone who wouldn't even be rosterable at most other positions if you wait, and you're going to have to rely on someone who is probably a fringe major-leaguer at any other spot.

So, while there may be gaps between the other positions, depending on which part of the rankings you choose, it's not a big enough one to move anyone more than a round or two up, based on position. What is scarce in Fantasy baseball in 2018 among hitters are catchers and stolen bases.

So, in years past, Corey Seager may have stood out above the crowd at shortstop; however, he hasn't finished better than 45th overall in either of his two seasons, and isn't projected to be a top-40 player by either SportsLine or PECOTA. In spite of that, his current ADP sits at 35th, a sign that Fantasy owners are still willing to pay that premium for a shortstop, even one who doesn't steal bases.

Maybe it will work out. However, with guys like Jean Segura, Xander Bogaerts and Didi Gregorius going at various points in the draft after Seager, it just doesn't feel like a priority. And that's not even mentioning upside plays like Trevor Story, Paul DeJong or Zack Cozart, going much later.

If you want to pay for a positional adjustment, go grab Gary Sanchez. He might give you 25 homers, 40 runs, and 50 RBI more than the No. 12 catcher. That's a price worth paying. For the rest of your roster, worry more about category scarcity than positional scarcity, and just try to target production. This should help.