The coronavirus is seemingly affecting, well, everything these days. Canceled meetings globally, the moving around of sporting events, even the possibility of not conducting the Olympics later this summer.

The PGA Tour, which to this point has not been directly affected in the same way the European Tour and Asian Tour have been, stated Monday their plans for handling the coronavirus and how it will affect scheduled events.

The PGA Tour has been closely monitoring all available information related to the continued spread of the Novel Coronavirus COVIC-19. We conduct more than 175 tournaments across our six tours, and the health and safety of our players, employees, fans, partners, volunteers and everyone associated with the PGA Tour continues to be our No. 1 priority. 

After reviewing the relevant positions from the Centers of Disease Control and the World Health Organization, there are no planned schedule changes beyond what has already been decide with the PGA Tour Series-China (a delay to the start of the season). However, we are establishing additional protocols to promote the health and safety of all participants and fans at our tournaments, and we will regularly review our schedule in light of revised CDC and WHO reports and make any updates as necessary.

The PGA Tour's Asian swing (held near the origination of the coronavirus) concluded in the fall before any of this happened. It's good timing because the tour likely would have had to cancel or delay at least one of its tournaments in China, South Korea and Japan.

It will be interesting, though, to see how this impacts the rest of this year, not only in golf but other sports as well. And it could affect golf internationally even more. The European Tour has canceled -- with the intent of rescheduling -- the Maybank Championship and Volvo China Open.

With golf set to take place at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo for the second consecutive cycle of the Olympic Games -- and more players intent on playing than last time when zika (remember that?) was a scare -- a cancellation of that event would a big bummer for the broader sports world.