After a forensic examination, MLB ruled on D-Backs coach who wore Apple Watch

Wednesday night, the Diamondbacks beat the Rockies (ARI 11, COL 8) in the NL Wild Card Game to advance to the NLDS. They'll take on the Dodgers in the best-of-five series, which begins Friday. Here's everything you need to know about that series.

During Wednesday's game cameras caught D-Backs coach Ariel Prieto wearing an illegal electronic device in the dugout, specifically an Apple Watch. Considerint the Red Sox were recently busted for using an Apple Watch as part of an elaborate sign-stealing scheme, seeing another one in the dugout is a pretty big deal.

The D-Backs denied any wrongdoing, claiming it was a simply mistake that Prieto did not remove the watch before the game. MLB launched an investigation anyway, and on Friday they announced Prieto has been fined even though they determined the watch was not used for baseball reasons. Here is MLB's statement:

Major League Baseball has completed its inquiry into the matter of the watch worn by Arizona Diamondbacks coach/interpreter Ariel Prieto in the dugout during the National League Wild Card Game on Wednesday night at Chase Field.  The inquiry was conducted by MLB's Department of Investigations, and the findings were submitted to Baseball Commissioner Robert D. Manfred, Jr.

MLB forensically examined Mr. Prieto's Apple Watch and his cell phone and interviewed Mr. Prieto.  MLB found no evidence that Mr. Prieto used the Apple Watch or cell phone for any purpose in the dugout, nor any baseball-related communication on either device, during Wednesday's game. 

Despite these findings, Mr. Prieto violated MLB's on-field regulation by having this device in the dugout.  As a result, Mr. Prieto and the D-backs have each been fined an undisclosed amount.  The amount of the fines will in turn be donated by the Office of the Commissioner to hurricane relief efforts in Puerto Rico.

MLB does allow certain electronic devices, including iPads loaded with scouting reports and video, in the dugout, though they may not be internet-enabled. Following the Red Sox incident the league notified all 30 teams that any future infractions would incur a more serious penalty, potentially including the loss of draft picks, though that didn't happen here.

CBS Sports Writer

Mike Axisa joined CBS Sports in 2013. He has been a member of the BBWAA since 2015 and has previously written about both fantasy baseball and real life baseball for MLBTradeRumors.com, FanGraphs.com, RotoAuthority.com,... Full Bio

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