Redskins exec calls Kirk Cousins 'Kurt' while explaining team's lowball contract offer

The Washington Redskins made the decision Monday to let Kirk Cousins play out the 2017 NFL season on a one-year deal worth $23.9 million courtesy of his second-straight franchise tag. The Redskins did not simply let the deadline pass, however.

Shortly after 4 p.m. ET, President Bruce Allen took to the podium to deliver a statement on the negotiations with Cousins, explicitly laying out what he says are the details surrounding Washington's offer to Cousins.

Allen says that the team previously made a contract offer that featured $53 million guaranteed to the quarterback. The first problem with this offer is that Cousins will make roughly $53 million at bare mimimum if the Redskins use the transition tag on him again in 2018. 

The second problem? Allen spent the entirety of his statement referring to Kirk as "Kurt." Here's a mashup from Dan Steinberg of the Washington Post.

Or Allen at least appeared to do so -- the Redskins PR staff told John Keim of ESPN that it was simply a matter of Allen's accent. And it's OK to give him that on a certain level. I just had my wife listen to me say "Kirk" a bunch of times and there were several "Kurts" (most of them were Kurts?) in there. She's majored in linguistics in college and says it's "an easy syllable for people to swallow." 

But Allen is giving a statement about a guy who he's negotiating with -- it would help to slow down and enunciate "the --irk" part of his name. 

Good news for the Redskins is that Cousins didn't mind the statement.

And he doesn't even mind being called "Kurt."

The bad news for the Redskins is that Cousins has them over a barrel. Whether it's Kirk, Kurt or Kirby is irrelevant, because Cousins is set to make more than $50 million in guaranteed money over the next two years and, if he is so inclined, leave the Redskins for another team after that.

Washington may very well explore other options this offseason, such as trading him (hello, 49ers), because at this point it is hard to imagine the two sides working out a deal.

Some reports Monday indicated Cousins is no longer trying out for Washington, but instead the Redskins are trying out for Cousins. If that is indeed the case, they probably did not pass with flying colors on the first test. 

CBS Sports Senior Writer

Will Brinson joined CBS Sports in 2010 and enters his seventh season covering the NFL for CBS. He previously wrote for FanHouse along with myriad other Internet sites. A North Carolina native who lives... Full Bio

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